Tag Archives: Single Market

May to inform Parliament on Brexit plans

UK Prime Minister Theresa May will put forward her plan for a Brexit transition period with unchanged access to EU markets when she briefs MPs on Monday about her latest negotiating results with Brussels.

While attending EU Summit in Brussels May secured an agreement to move forward onto the topic of transitional and long-term trading arrangements with the continent.

On Monday she will report back to parliament the results of her Brussels trip, setting out the framework of a time-limited implementation period of two years, designed to facilitate Brexit and provide clarity for businesses and citizens.

The outline of the transition period that May will present is consistent with plans she has previously proposed, and they will be a subject to next stage of negotiation in Brussels.

Tusk for “clarity” in transition period

“This morning, I received the confirmation from our negotiators that sufficient progress has been made. This allows me to present the draft guidelines for the December European Council, which I have just sent to the leaders. My proposals are the following” – said EU Council president Donald Tusk.

“First, we should start negotiating the transition period, so that people and businesses have clarity about their situation. As you know, the UK has asked for a transition of about two years, while remaining part of the Single Market and Customs Union. And we will be ready to discuss this, but naturally, we have our conditions. I propose that during this period, the UK will respect:

  • the whole of EU law, including new law;
  • it will respect budgetary commitments;
  • it will respect judicial oversight;
  • and of course, all the related obligations.

“Clearly, within the transition period following the UK’s withdrawal, EU decision-making will continue among the 27 member states, without the UK.

“All of what I have said seems to be the only reasonable solution, and it is in the interest of all our citizens that it is agreed as soon as possible. This is why I will ask the EU leaders to mandate our negotiator to start these talks immediately.

“Second, we want to begin discussions with the UK in order to explore the British vision of its future relationship with the EU. So far, we have heard a number of various ideas. We need more clarity on how the UK sees our future relations, after it has left the Single Market and Customs Union. I therefore propose to mandate our negotiator to start exploratory talks with our British friends about this problem. On our side, we are ready to start preparing a close EU-UK partnership in trade, but also in the fight against terrorism and international crime as well as security, defence and foreign policy. For this to happen, the European Council will have to adopt additional guidelines next year.

“While being satisfied with today’s agreement, which is obviously the personal success of Prime Minister Theresa May, let us remember that the most difficult challenge is still ahead. We all know that breaking up is hard. But breaking up and building a new relationship is much harder. Since the Brexit referendum, a year and a half has passed. So much time has been devoted to the easier part of the task. And now, to negotiate a transition arrangement and the framework for our future relationship, we have de facto less than a year”.

 

Irish border issue unclear until UK-EU trade deal

The UK will not resolve the question of the Irish border after Brexit until it has also agreed the outline of a trade deal with the EU27, the country’s International Trade Minister Liam Fox said.

However, Fox said it would be very difficult to address the issue of the border while the UK relationship with the EU after Brexit remains unclear.

“We don’t want there to be a hard border but the United Kingdom is going to be leaving the customs union and the single market,” he told Sky News.

“We can’t get a final answer to the Irish question until we get an idea of the end state, and until we get into discussions with the European Union on the end state that will be very difficult.”

Barnier reacts on May's Florence speech

“In her speech in Florence, Prime Minister Theresa May has expressed a constructive spirit which is also the spirit of the European Union during this unique negotiation” – says the text of a Statement issued by the EU chief Brexit negotiator  Michel Barnier.

“The speech shows a willingness to move forward, as time is of the essence. We need to reach an agreement by autumn 2018 on the conditions of the United Kingdom’s orderly withdrawal from the European Union. The UK will become a third country on 30 March 2019.”

“Our priority is to protect the rights of citizens. EU27 citizens in the United Kingdom must have the same rights as British citizens today in the European Union. These rights must be implemented effectively and safeguarded in the same way in the United Kingdom as in the European Union, as recalled by the European Council and European Parliament. Prime Minister May’s statements are a step forward but they must now be translated into a precise negotiating position of the UK government.”

“With regard to Ireland, the United Kingdom is the co-guarantor of the Good Friday Agreement. Today’s speech does not clarify how the UK intends to honour its special responsibility for the consequences of its withdrawal for Ireland. Our objective is to preserve the Good Friday Agreement in all its dimensions, as well as the integrity of the Single Market and the Customs Union.”

“The United Kingdom recognises that no Member State will have to pay more or receive less because of Brexit. We stand ready to discuss the concrete implications of this pledge. We shall assess, on the basis of the commitments taken by the 28 Member States, whether this assurance covers all commitments made by the United Kingdom as a Member State of the European Union.”

“Today, for the first time, the United Kingdom government has requested to continue to benefit from access to the Single Market, on current terms, and to continue to benefit from existing cooperation in security. This is for a limited period of up to two years, beyond its withdrawal date, and therefore beyond its departure from the EU institutions.”

“If the European Union so wishes, this new request could be taken into account. It should be examined in light of the European Council guidelines of 29 April 2017: “Should a time-limited prolongation of Union acquis be considered, this would require existing Union regulatory, budgetary, supervisory, judiciary and enforcement instruments and structures to apply.”

“The sooner we reach an agreement on the principles of the orderly withdrawal in the different areas – and on the conditions of a possible transition period requested by the United Kingdom – the sooner we will be ready to engage in a constructive discussion on our future relationship.”

“The EU shares the goal of establishing an ambitious partnership for the future. The fact that the government of the United Kingdom recognises that leaving the European Union means that it cannot keep all the benefits of membership with fewer obligations than the other Member States is welcome. In any case, the future relationship will need to be based on a balance of rights and obligations. It will need to respect the integrity of the Union’s legal order and the autonomy of its decision-making.

“The EU will continue to insist on sufficient progress in the key areas of the orderly withdrawal of the United Kingdom before opening discussions on the future relationship. Agreeing on the essential principles in these areas will create the trust that is needed for us to build a future relationship together.

“David Davis and I will meet in Brussels next Monday to begin the fourth round of the negotiations. As always, we are preparing the upcoming round with the 27 Member States and the European Parliament. On Monday I will have a discussion with the European Parliament in its Brexit Steering Group, as well as with all Member States in the General Affairs Council.

“We look forward to the United Kingdom’s negotiators explaining the concrete implications of Prime Minister Theresa May’s speech. Our ambition is to find a rapid agreement on the conditions of the United Kingdom’s orderly withdrawal, as well as on a possible transition period.”

Hammond for Brexit 'transitional' deal

The UK Chancellor of the Exchequer Philip Hammond, speaking on the margins of a G20 summit in Hamburg, said his preference was to negotiate a “transitional structure” that takes his country out of the Single market and Customs union “but in the transition phase replicates as much as possible of the existing arrangements”.

According to Hammond his aim would be to minimize the shock to business.

The UK should negotiate a transitional Brexit deal that replicates its membership of EU structures as closely as possible, Hammond continued, acknowledging the UK will not stay in the Single market or Customs union.

Hammond welcomed corporate input into the discussion on managing Brexit, a day after the CBI employers group said Britain should stay in the EU’s Single market as it works out new ties with the bloc beyond Brexit in 2019.

“I’m glad that the business community is exercising a voice in this discussion. I think that is helpful,” he said, adding: “I do not believe it is either legally or politically possible to say in the customs union and in the single market.”

 

May to end EU ‘free movement’ to UK

The UK Prime Minister Theresa May will make a pledge ahead of the June 8 election to end European Union free movement of people into Britain, the Daily Mail newspaper reported, citing unidentified party sources.

May will also include pledges in her election manifesto to pull out of both the EU Single market and European Court of Justice, the newspaper said.

May surprised allies, opponents and financial markets on Tuesday, 18.04.2017, when she called an early  election for June 8.

https://twitter.com/DavidJo52951945/status/854964683794731008

Schaeuble fears Brexit “contamination”

German Finance Minister Woflfgang Schaeuble said that the European Union was trying to limit the negative effects of Brexit for Britain but stressed that countries wanting to get the benefits related to the bloc had to make commitments, too.

“We need to find a fair path – if Britain still wants to have good access to the single market, it has to take on the corresponding commitments and if it doesn’t want that, then there will be a separation – that’s a shame for Britain,” Schaeuble told Deutschlandfunk radio station.

“We’re trying to keep the disadvantages as small as possible but it’s clear that the rest of Europe must not be contaminated by it,” he said.

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