Category Archives: Brexit

Less supporters of Brexit among MPs

More than 100 Westminster constituencies that voted to leave the EU have now switched their support to Remain, writes The Guardian newspaper, quoting new analysis seen by the Observer.

In findings that could have a significant impact on the parliamentary battle of Brexit later this year, the study concludes that most seats in Britain now contain a majority of voters who want to stay in the EU, the newspaper continues.

The analysis, one of the most comprehensive assessments of Brexit sentiment since the referendum, suggests the shift has been driven by doubts among Labour voters who backed Leave.

As a result, the trend is starkest in the north of England and Wales – Labour heartlands in which Brexit sentiment appears to be changing. The development will heap further pressure on Jeremy Corbyn to soften the party’s opposition to reconsidering Britain’s EU departure, the Guardian concludes.

Kurz aims at negociated Brexit

European Union leaders will discuss Brexit at next meeting hosted by the Austrian presidency of EU in  Salzburg,  September 20,  Prime Minister Theresa May’s office indicated after discussions with Austrian Chancellor Sebastian Kurz.

The summit will also cover illegal migration, and on this the Prime Minister confirmed that the UK will continue to work closely with the EU now and after Brexit,” May’s office said in a statement.

UK  has yet to agree on a new frame for  trade relationship with the European Union, and conclude two-year transition period after the departure from the EU will take on March 29 next year.

Prime minister Kurz  received his British counterpart May for talks in Salzburg,  underlining that it was important for both sides to avoid a “hard” or unregulated Brexit.

Britons sceptical about May Brexit plan

Prime Minister Theresa May сoncept to leave the European Union is overwhelmingly opposed by the British public and more than a third of voters would support a new right-wing political party committed to quitting the bloc, according to a new poll.

Political vulnerability of May government was exposed by the survey which found voters would prefer Boris Johnson, who quit as her foreign minister to negotiate with the EU and lead the Conservative Party into the next election.

Only 16% of voters say May is handling the Brexit negotiations well, compared with 34% who say that Johnson would do a better job, according to the poll conducted by YouGov for The Sunday Times newspaper.

Barnier warns Brexit talks running out of time

Britain’s proposals on its future relationship with the European Union contain constructive elements, but many questions remain, EU Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier said.

In a press statement Barnier ensured that he will continue discussion with Dominic Raab in a constructive way, suggesting the main focus must be the finalisation of the Withdrawal Agreement.

“Let me recall that the Withdrawal Agreement is the prerequisite for an orderly withdrawal, for the transition period, and for creating the trust that we need to build a solid partnership for the future” – Barnier said.

The border issue between Ireland and Northern Ireland is in first ranks, Barnier continued, because Europe is committed to protect Ireland and Northern Ireland against the consequences of Brexit and to preserve the Good Friday Agreement in all its dimensions.

“Let me simply recall the commitment taken by Prime Minister Theresa May to have a backstop in her letter to President Tusk in March. The respect of this commitment is essential” – Barnier reminded. He also made clear to Dominic Raab  that “we are not asking for a border between Northern Ireland and the rest of the UK. What we need is checks on goods because the UK wants to leave the Single Market, the Customs Union and our common commercial policy”.

Barnier pointed out that the time is running out, asking UK to continue working on issues without pause.

“We are open to any solutions as long as they are workable and can be transformed into a legally operative text in time for the Withdrawal Agreement”.

However, he underlined that it is also EU27 responsibility to be prepared for all scenarios, including a “no deal”, quoting the European Council request to be prepared for for “all scenarios”.

“We are encouraging national administrations and companies to use the time we have, which is very short, to accelerate this preparation” – Barnier concluded.

 

UK post-Brexit trade deal with U.S “absolutely possible”

During his visit to the United Kingdom President Donald Trump said the United States and Britain could secure a “great” post-Brexit trade deal, lavishing praise on Prime Minister Theresa May.

Standing alongside Prime minister May after the meeting at her Buckinghamshire country residence, Mr Trump praised her as an “incredible woman” and a “very tough negotiator” who was “doing a fantastic job“, and said there could be a “great” trade deal between the US and UK.

I read reports where that won’t be possible, but I believe after speaking with the prime minister’s people and representatives and trade experts it will absolutely be possible” – President Trump said commenting on US-UK trade deal.

Johnson resigns leaving government in turmoil over Brexit

Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson resigned on Monday, July 9, over Prime Minister Theresa May’s plans of Article 50 Brexit arrangements, the second resignation in a day leaving the British leader Brexit proposal in a profound crisis.

“This afternoon, the Prime Minister accepted the resignation of Boris Johnson as Foreign Secretary,” May’s spokesman said in a statement. “His replacement will be announced shortly. The Prime Minister thanks Boris for his work.”

On the 9 July 2018, following the resignation of David Davis Dominic Raab was appointed Secretary of State for Exiting of the European Union.

Davis-May correspondence on Brexit

The UK media published two letters, the exchange of opinions over Brexit strategy of the resigned top negotiator David Davis and the response of Prime Minister Theresa May.

The text of the letter David Davis sent the Prime Minister, tendering his resignation as Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union below:

Dear Prime Minister,

As you know there have been a significant number of occasions in the last year or so on which I have disagreed with the Number 10 policy line, ranging from accepting the Commission’s sequencing of negotiations through to the language on Northern Ireland in the December Joint Report. At each stage I have accepted collective responsibility because it is part of my task to find workable compromises, and because I considered it was still possible to deliver on the mandate of the referendum, and on our manifesto commitment to leave the Customs Union and the Single Market.

I am afraid that I think the current trend of policy and tactics is making that look less and less likely. Whether it is the progressive dilution of what I thought was a firm Chequers agreement In February on right to diverge, or the unnecessary delays of the start of the White Paper, or the presentation of a backstop proposal that omitted the strict conditions that I requested and believed that we had agreed, the general direction of policy will leave us in at best a weak negotiating position, and possibly an inescapable one.

The Cabinet decision on Friday crystallised this problem. In my view the inevitable consequence of the proposed policies will be to make the supposed control by Parliament illusory rather than real.

As I said at Cabinet, the “common rule book” policy hands control of large swathes of our economy to the EU and is certainly not returning control of our laws in any real sense.

I am also unpersuaded that our negotiating approach will not just lead to further demands for concessions.

Of course this is a complex area of judgement and it is possible that you are right and I am wrong. However, even in that event it seems to me that the national interest requires a Secretary of State in my Department that is an enthusiastic believer in your approach, and not merely a reluctant conscript. While I have been grateful to you for the opportunity to serve, it is with great regret that I tender my resignation from the Cabinet with immediate effect.

Yours ever
David Davis __________________________________ signature

 The full text of Theresa May’s reply to David Davis below:

Dear David,

Thank you for your letter explaining your decision to resign as Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union.

I am sorry that you have chosen to leave the Government when we have already made so much progress towards delivering a smooth and successful Brexit, and when we are only eight months from the date set in law when the United Kingdom will leave the European Union.

At Chequers on Friday, we as the Cabinet agreed a comprehensive and detailed proposal which provides a precise, responsible, and credible basis for progressing our negotiations towards a new relationship between the UK and the EU after we leave in March. We set out how we will deliver on the result of the referendum and the commitments we made in our manifesto for the 2017 general election:

1. Leaving the EU on 29 March 2019.
2. Ending free movement and taking back control of our borders.
3. No more sending vast sums of money each year to the EU.
4. A new business-friendly customs model with freedom to strike new trade deals around the world.
5. A UK-EU free trade area with a common rulebook for industrial goods and agricultural products which will be good for jobs.
6. A commitment to maintain high standards on consumer and employment rights and the environment.
7. A Parliamentary lock on all new rules and regulations.
8. Leaving the Common Agricultural Policy and the Common Fisheries Policy.
9. Restoring the supremacy of British courts by ending the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice in the UK.
10. No hard border between Northern Ireland and Ireland, or between Northern Ireland and Great Britain.
11. Continued, close co-operation on security to keep our people safe.
12. An independent foreign and defence policy, working closely with the EU and other allies.

This is consistent with the mandate of the referendum and with the commitments we laid out in our general election manifesto: leaving the single market and the customs union but seeking a deep and special partnership including a comprehensive free trade and customs agreement; ending the vast annual contributions to the EU; and pursuing fair, orderly negotiations, minimising disruption and giving as much certainty as possible so both sides benefit.

As we said in our manifesto, we believe it is necessary to agree the terms of our future partnership alongside our withdrawal, reaching agreement on both within the two years allowed by Article 50.

I have always agreed with you that these two must go alongside one another, but if we are to get sufficient detail about our future partnership, we need to act now. We have made a significant move: it is for the EU now to respond in the same spirit.

I do not agree with your characterisation of the policy we agreed at Cabinet on Friday.

Parliament will decide whether or not to back the deal the Government negotiates, but that deal will undoubtedly mean the returning of powers from Brussels to the United Kingdom.

The direct effect of EU law will end when we leave the EU. Where the UK chooses to apply a common rulebook, each rule will have to be agreed by Parliament.

Choosing not to sign up to certain rules would lead to consequences for market access, security co-operation or the frictionless border, but that decision will rest with our sovereign Parliament, which will have a lock on whether to incorporate those rules into the UK legal order.

I am sorry that the Government will not have the benefit of your continued expertise and counsel as we secure this deal and complete the process of leaving the EU, but I would like to thank you warmly for everything you have done over the past two years as Secretary of State to shape our departure from the EU, and the new role the UK will forge on the world stage as an independent, self-governing nation once again.

You returned to Government after nineteen years to lead an entirely new Department responsible for a vital, complex, and unprecedented task.

You have helped to steer through Parliament some of the most important legislation for generations, including the European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Act 2017 and the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018, which received Royal Assent last week.

These landmark Acts, and what they will do, stand as testament to your work and our commitment to honouring the result of the referendum.

Yours sincerely,

Theresa May__________________________ singanture

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