Category Archives: Brexit

UK government opposes II Brexit referendum

The idea of a second Brexit referendum is very likely to be voted again in Westminster although the government remains opposed to the second plebiscite on the same issue of leaving the European Union, the British finance minister said.

I remain optimistic that over the next couple of months we will get a deal done,” he told reporters in Washington where he is attending meetings at the International Monetary Fund.

Philip Hammond said he hoped parliament would break the Brexit deadlock by passing a deal by the end of June, potentially ending the calls for a new referendum, and there was a “good chance” of a breakthrough in talks with the opposition Labour Party.

EU Brexit half-a-year extension

European Union leaders agreed to offer the UK six more months to leave the bloc, more than Prime Minister Theresa May said she requested. The Brussels Summit concluded in the early hours on April 11 that the second extension is granted, which signifies Britain will not exit on April 12, as the suggested the first extension, shifting the deadline to October 31.

However the extension  does not define if it must end with the UK exit, or it can be followed by the other extension in case the deal is not endorsed by the Westminster by that moment. It certainly offers more time to Prime minister to convince the Members of Parliament to support her Article 50 Agreement with the EU. The deal rejected three times in the House of Commons is not to be re-opened or re-negotiated the EU underlines, claiming it is the best possible agreement, and there will be not other.

The shifting of  the Brexit deadline has an impact on the European Parliament, meaning the UK has an obligation to organise the European elections,  being the EU member-state. Any further shifting the deadline beyond end October would mean the UK would participate in appointment of the European Commissioners, the development seen as irrelevant to the UK decision to leave the EU.

 

EU to grant May conditional Brexit extension

European Union will grant Prime Minister Theresa May a second delay to Brexit deadline at an emergency summit on April 10,  but the are many indications that the leaders will impose the conditions.

Before the Summit  PM May visited Berlin and Paris on the eve of the summit to agree with Angela Merkel and Emmanuel Macron to allow her to put off the departure from April 12 to June 30, a day before the constitution of the new European Parliament.

May had requested the EU to shift the deadline to June 30 but the EU Brussels a has an intention of a conditional extension to end of the year or even for one year to end March 2020. The question is if the UK government will be in the position to accept the conditions imposed with the deadline shift.

May asks for further Brexit delay

British Prime minister Theresa May asked for further delay of Brexit deadline to June 30, meaning the EU is facing a dilemma of the admittance of  the UK in participation in the upcoming European elections (end May 2019). The prolongation beyond April 11 also indicates that Britons will imperatively participate in the European elections as the EU Treaty stipulates.

The European politicians have already expressed concerns about further delay negatives effects, which could lead to “hijacking” of the elections by Brexit crisis, creating a protracted situation of instability. An extension beyond delay, given already, could be granted on condition of endorsement of the Brexit deal only, previously the EU executives underlined. They have been cultivating an opinion within the EU institution,  that any further delay without a clear purpose and schedule is not conducive to European agenda, blocking many significant developments within the EU27.

No breakthrough in May-Corbyn talks

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said on that Prime Minister Theresa May had not moved far enough in a first round of crisis talks intended to achieve a breakthrough in the domestic deadlock over endorsement of  the EU-UK Withdrawal Agreement to avoid disorderly exit from the European Union. (Image above: illustration).

“There hasn’t been as much change as I expected,Corbyn said, according to British media reports. “The meeting was useful but inconclusive” 

May-Corbyn compromise evokes skepticism

British Prime Minister Theresa May met opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn in an attempt to find a common Brexit solution, endorsing her government Article 50 Agreement with the EU.

After her EU withdrawal deal  (WA) was rejected three times in the House of Commons, with MPs, including her Conservative Party divided over Brexit deal negociated for two years, May said she would talk to the Labour Party leader in a bid to overcome the stalemate, becoming a Brexit crisis.

Nicola Sturgeon, First minister of Scotland said a deal between Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn will be a “second best compromise” that “satisfies nobody, makes the country poorer, and potentially could be unpicked by a new Prime minister like Boris Johnson

EU-UK visa free travel reciprocity

“The Council and the European Parliament have agreed that, following Brexit, UK citizens coming to the Schengen area for a short stay (90 days in any 180 days) should be granted visa free travel. This agreement was confirmed yesterday by EU ambassadors on behalf of the Council and by the European Parliament Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs committee today. The text now needs to be formally adopted by the European Parliament and the Council”  European Council announced.

“According to EU rules, visa exemption is granted on condition of reciprocity. The government of the United Kingdom has stated that it does not intend to require a visa from EU citizens travelling to the UK for short stays. In the event that the United Kingdom introduces a visa requirement for nationals of at least one member state in the future, the existing reciprocity mechanism would apply and the three EU institutions and the member states would undertake to act without delay in applying the mechanism. The Commission would monitor the respect of the principle of reciprocity on a continuous basis and immediately inform the European Parliament and the Council of any developments which could endanger the respect of this principle.”

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