Tag Archives: women

Japanese independent women

From eating out to camping, more Japanese women are doing things alone as they wish to enjoy their time to themselves.

In the past, those without family members, partners or friends were commonly looked upon in a negative light. However, this view has been changing with so-called soloists increasingly being seen as independent.

You make your own decisions, so you get the chance to face yourself,” said free-lance writer Mayumi Asai, who has been promoting a perception. “There is no feeling of loneliness, only one of significance and accomplishment.”

Her writing has garnered support from like-minded individuals who comment that they also enjoy undertaking activities by themselves and want to have similar experiences to hers.

One day last month Asai could be found strawberry picking at a farm in the city of Kawagoe, Saitama Prefecture.

Unlike the majority of visitors, who comprised couples and families, Asai had come alone. After picking a few dozen strawberries, she went on to take some pictures of the cherry blossoms in bloom along a nearby river.

The 33-year-old began doing things on her own as a university student after a female friend who had grown up abroad told her she liked to eat at ramen (quick-cooking noodles) restaurants by herself. Asai had always felt it was a burden to have to consider the feelings of others when hanging out in a group, but this feeling disappeared when she followed the example of her friend and began eating on her own.

According to a 2015 study conducted by the National Institute of Population and Social Security Research, 36% of women responded that they would not feel lonely if they were to spend the rest of their lives by themselves, up 7% points from the previous study five years before.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe would like 30% of Japanese business leaders to be women by 2020. A record 75.7% of women between the ages of 25 and 39 held jobs in 2017, up 6% from 2012, according to a survey by the Internal Affairs Ministry. Confronted by a labor shortage, companies are offering flexible hours, enabling mothers with small children to hold on to their jobs.

Woman Kyoto

 

EU supports Nobel Prize winners projects

The European Commission has announced an additional €5 million in support of concrete projects of the two 2018 Nobel Peace Prize laureates, Nadia Murad and Dr Denis Mukwege maintaining its commitment to women who are victims of sexual violence.

This new support was announced  in Brussels as the EU top diplomat Federica Mogherini and Commissioner for Development, Neven Mimica, met with Nadia Murad and Dr Denis Mukwege. The two winners were invited to discuss the eradication of violence against women and its impact on development, together with EU development Ministers at the Foreign Affairs Council.

“As the European Union, we admire the immense courage and tireless work of Nadia Murad and Dr Denis Mukwege, who often put their own lives at risk. We have a duty to support their work and all the people they represent, as we are doing, and this is also the best way to celebrate the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women” Mogherini said.

“Violence against women and girls is one of the most horrendous crimes, one of the greatest injustices of our time, and an obstacle to the development of any society. I am very pleased to be able to strengthen our support for the 2018 Nobel Peace Prize laureates. This is how the European Union can help put an end to sexual violence, once and for all, everywhere in the world”, Commissioner Neven Mimica added

The EU plans to strengthen its ongoing stabilisation and reconstruction efforts in the Sinjar region in Iraq through a €1 million contribution to Nadia Murad’sSinjar Action Fund” initiative. European development cooperation in the liberated areas of Da’esh in the country supports in particular the needs of displaced populations, vulnerable groups and local communities.

A further €4 million will support Dr Mukweges work to ensure the continuity of support programmes for victims of sexual violence and women suffering from gynecological conditions at the Panzi Hospital in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).

This initiative for the reconstruction of Sinjar will create infrastructure, schools, hospitals, and encourage the return of displaced populations to their homeland.

Since 2014, the European Union’s development cooperation in Iraq amounts to approximately €310 million. Part of this funding is specifically dedicated to the stabilisation and the socio-economic reconstruction of the areas liberated from Da’esh. EU support helps create the conditions for sustainable return of displaced people, including by clearing contaminated sites, restoring basic services and providing livelihoods. Since the beginning of the crisis, more than 1.7 million displaced people have returned to their homes.

The European support for the two 2018 Nobel Peace Prize laureates is part of its broader commitment to gender equality and women’s empowerment globally. The EU has established an ambitious partnership with the United Nations by launching the “Spotlight Initiative” in September 2017. This programme is supported by €500 million to fight all forms of violence against women and girls.

Following the South-East Asia programme of the Spotlight initiative launched in November 2017 and the Latin America programme launched in September 2018, the Africa programme will be officially launched in early 2019. With €250 million in funding, the Africa programme will focus on combating harmful practices, such as female genital mutilation and forced child marriage.

Salvini suggests chemical castration of rapists

A 20-year-old Tunisian migrant allegedly raped a 38-year-old Slovakian woman in the Baobab volunteer-run migrant centre outside Rome’s Tiburtina rail station at night on October, 11,  Interior Minister Matteo Salvini said, calling for the chemical castration of the alleged rapist. (Image: illustration).

In some countries as South Korea, Poland, EstoniaIndonesia and the US states of California and Florida  there is a practice of mandatory use of chemical castration for certain convicted sex offenders.

Recently Kazakhstan has adopted laws for chemical castration of pedophiles.

 

EU action against sexual violence in conflicts

On the occasion of the International Day for the Elimination of Sexual Violence in Conflict, Federica Mogherini, High Representative/Vice-President, Johannes Hahn, Commissioner for European Neighbourhood Policy and Enlargement Negotiations, Neven Mimica, Commissioner for International Cooperation and Development, Christos Stylianides, Commissioner for Humanitarian Aid and Crisis Management, and Věra Jourová, Commissioner for Justice, Consumers and Gender Equality, made the following statement:

Sexual violence against women and girls, boys and men is a despicable crime, and even more so when it occurs in situations of conflict, or as a tactic of war. It is a grave violation of human rights and international humanitarian law. For this reason, the European Union always has and will continue to condemn and fight sexual violence in conflict with the strongest commitment” – the text of the joint  statement says.

“All survivors must be guaranteed access to comprehensive psychological and health care services, as well as justice and reparations. We expect all states to conduct effective investigation of those crimes, to bring perpetrators to justice and to ensure accountability for past crimes, also to prevent future atrocities” – the EU statement continues.

“Children born following wartime rape and their mothers need to be protected and granted rights, as they often face exclusion and stigmatisation from their own communities and families. We should never forget those victims of war and stand in full support with them.

“The EU has been working hand in hand with its Member States, international partners, and civil society to enshrine the respect of fundamental human rights in peacebuilding efforts worldwide.

“We cannot be passive witness of crimes having such deep and long-term consequences on human beings, communities and entire societies. We will continue investing in raising awareness, while building more equal, educated and respectful societies within and outside our borders. This is and will stay at the core of the EU institutions and with partners around the world.

“We are fully determined to continue taking concrete actions to prevent and eliminate sexual and gender-based violence, in times of peace or conflict” – the statement concludes.

In a global approach, EU policy tools aim at eliminating all forms of conflict-related sexual violence, as part of the broader women, peace and security agenda and as a key aspect of conflict prevention, sustaining peace and sustainable development. This work is guided by the key objectives stipulated in the EU’s Global Strategy for Foreign and Security Policy, the new European Consensus on Development and the EU Gender Action Plan II.

  • The joint EU-UN Spotlight Initiative to eliminate all forms of violence against women and girls has been given an initial EU investment of €500 million.
  • In 2017, almost €22 million were allocated in humanitarian aid for the prevention of and response to sexual and gender-based violence worldwide.
  • The EU currently holds the leadership of the ‘Call to Action on Protection from Gender-Based Violence in Emergencies’, a global initiative of more than 70 stakeholders to prevent and mitigate gender-based violence, from the earliest onset of a crisis. Also in the areas where our CSDP missions and operations are operating, the EU is supporting 43 multi-year projects, for an amount of €43 million, and two relevant multi-country programmes of €8.5 million, to prevent and address sexual violence. The EU also recently reinforced its zero-tolerance policy for abuses perpetrated by its own staff deployed in missions abroad. As an international framework, the EU signed in 2017 the Council of Europe’s Istanbul Convention, as the first pan-European legal instrument and the most far-reaching international treaty to prevent and combat violence against women including sexual violence. The Convention explicitly recognises such abuses as human rights violations. (Image above: Nadia Murad a victim to sexual violence and EU Sakharov Prize winner, a human rights ,campaigner).