Tag Archives: Dmitry Medvedev

EU and Russia maintain positions on Ukraine

The European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker  congratulated Volodymyr Zelensky on his election as President of Ukraine. “The people of Ukraine have demonstrated their strong attachment to democracy and the Rule of Law throughout the electoral process. The EU will continue to support Ukraine’s reform path and sovereignty Juncker wrote on his Twitter micro blog page. He also ensured the EU “steadfast” support of the territorial integrity of Ukraine.

Russian prime minister Dmitry Medvedev wrote it is “obvious” that the new President of Ukraine will have to “consolidate” the country “with due account of the reality that took shape over past years”.

“Full-scale trade war on Russia”

The US has actually declared trade war on Russia by tightening sanctions against it, Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev said in a Facebook post. He is confident that these measures will have no sense and that Russia, nevertheless, will be able to develop, according to TASS news agency.

“We will quietly continue our work to develop economy and the social sphere and will be engaged in import substitution, as well as address most important state tasks, counting upon ourselves, first of all,” the prime minister stated. “We have learnt to do it in the recent years in the conditions of almost closed financial markets, fear of foreign creditors and investors to bankroll in Russia on pain of sanctions against third parties and countries,” he added. “It benefitted us in some way, though sanctions are senseless as a whole,” Medvedev stated. “We’ll pull through,” the prime minister affirmed.

 

Is Medvedev aware Russian people demand his resignation?

Russian social media is guessing if prime minister Dmitry Medvedev (pictured) is aware of what happens in the country, while skiing amid  a massive anti-corruption protests demanding his resignation.

“How was your day?” an Instagram user identified as inspiridonoff messaged Medvedev within hours after Russia saw its largest nationwide demonstrations in years, underscored by calls from protesters for the prime minister to resign amid corruption allegations, questioning the sources of his extraordinary wealth. In recent year living standards of regular Russians drastically declined, officially registering 23 millions of poor, while the alternative non-governmental statistic researches ague the real number reaches 70 million, indicating more than half of population struggling with poverty.

“Not bad, I was skiing” he replied on his damedvedev handle without mentioning where, adding a smiley with its tongue hanging out for good measure.

Prime minister Medvedev is a big fan of skiing, personally supervising the development of ski resorts in Sochi, uniting and restructuring different companies, exploiting the mountain slopes.

Navalny jailed due to prosecutorial misconduct

Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny has been sentenced to 15 days in prison after being detained at a major opposition protest that he had inspired by issuing a video exposing an outstanding wealth of the incumbent Russia’s prime minister Dmitry Medvedev in a trial many experts access as a ‘prosecutorial misconduct’ to jail a political opponent of Kremlin. Navalny asked the judge to invite prime minister to court to explain the source of his lucrative lifestyle to Russian tax-payers.

A Moscow court issued the verdict on Monday against Navalny for allegedly resisting police orders on Sunday when he walked to the protest in the Russian capital.

Navalny, 40, posted a selfie on Twitter from the courtroom, saying: “A time will come when we’ll put them on trial too – and that time it will be fair.”

“Even the slightest allusion of fair justice is absent here,” Navalny said  when given a word to defendant himself, complaining about the judge striking down one motion after another.

“Yesterday’s events have shown that quite a large number of voters in Russia support the program of a candidate who stands for fighting corruption. These people demand political representation – and I strive to be their political representative.”

 

Navalny with hundreds of Russians detained for anti-corruption protest

Police detained anticorruption activist Aleksei Navalny (pictured) as thousands rallied, and dozens were arrested, in cities across Russia in some of the larger public demonstrations the country has seen in years.

Navalny, a gadfly crusader whose fight against graft has resonated with many Russians, was detained as he emerged with supporters from a subway station March 26 in central Moscow.

On Twitter, Roman Rubanov, the director of Navalny’s nongovernmental foundation, posted videos of a crowd of supporters trying to prevent the van carrying Navalny from moving amid a heavy riot police presence.

Russians unite in anti-corruption protests

Anticorruption protests led by Russian opposition politician Aleksei Navalny have begun in Russia’s Far East and Siberia. (Photo: demonstration in Novosibirsk)

In Vladivostok, police detained at least 30 people. Local Russian media outlets reported that around 1,000 people came out to the rally, which was sanctioned by the city administration.

In Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk, at least five were detained at the rally and nine others after the rally. Six people were detained at another rally in Komsomolsk-on-Amur.

The planned rallies come after Navalny’s anticorruption group released a report on March 2 accusing Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev of using charities and NGOs to collect donations from tycoons and state banks and using the funds to buy expensive assets.

Navalny, who helped lead large antigovernment demonstrations in Russia during 2011 and 2012, said he wants to bring as many as 15,000 people to the streets of Moscow to protest against what he says is rampant corruption among officials close to President Vladimir Putin.

Organizers have said they hope to hold rallies in 98 cities and towns across Russia.