Tag Archives: Leonardo da Vinci

Leonardo da Vinci 500 anniversary

Loire Valley is preparing to celebrate the 500th anniversary of the death of Leonardo da Vinci.

From January to December 2019, over 500 cultural events have been scheduled, including exhibits, performances, concerts and debates in the Centre-Val de Loire region, the second most-visited in France, after Paris.

It was in this green valley on the rivers of the Loire, a UNESCO world heritage site, that the Renaissance master moved in 1516.

Tuscan genius was invited by King Francis I and took with him masterworks like  Mona Lisa and St John the Baptist, which are today part of the Louvre collection.
Leonardo died at the chateau du Clos-Lucé in Amboise on May 2, 1519, where he is buried.

Leonardo’s squint eyes hypothesis

Leonardo da Vinci may have had a squint, according to a new research by a British art historian.
A study by Dr.Christopher W. Tyler of the University of London, argues that Leonardo may have had a form of strabismus, with a tendency for one eye to turn outward.
The hypothesis claims this may have actually been an advantage for artistic purposes and contributed to the depth of his works.

That’s the new Leonardo da Vinci exhibition in Florence next month is so special mainly because 2019 will be the 500th anniversary of Leonardo da Vinci’s death. A true “Renaissance man”, Leonardo’s interests varied from painting to engineering, and his studies gave birth to several modern practices like palaeontology and architecture.

The Uffizi Gallery is then getting a head start on celebrations with its new exhibition, titled Water, nature’s microscope— The Codex Leicester and Leonardo da Vinci, which will display many works and studies of the “Universal Genius”.

30/10/2018 – 20/01/2019 “Il Codice Leicester di Leonardo da Vinci. L’Acqua Microscopio della Natura”

Mona Lisa suffered thyroid deficiency

The most famous model in the history of humanity was not exemplary in terms of health: Mona Lisa suffered hypothyroidism, or thyroid deficiency which reflected in symptoms of her yellowish skin, thinning hair and a hint of goitre on her neck, the US researchers suggest.
In an article published in the September 2018 issue of the Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Brigham and Women’s Hospital researcher Mandeep Mehra and University of California, Santa Barbara’s Hilary Campbell thinks that clinical hypothyroidism is a more likely diagnosis than previous hypotheses including a lipid disorder and heart disease.
The enigma of the Mona Lisa can be resolved by a simple medical diagnosis of a hypothyroidism-related illness,” Dr.Mehra said.
In many ways, it is the allure of the imperfections of disease that give this masterpiece its mysterious reality and charm.” Had Lisa Gherardini suffered from heart disease and a lipid disorder, it’s unlikely she would have lived to such an advanced age given the limited treatments available in 16th century Italy, the scientists suggest.
Dr. Mehra cited the Mona Lisa‘s thinning hair, yellow skin, and possible goitre as visual symptoms of hypothyroidism.
“The diet of Italians during the Renaissance was lacking in iodine, and resulting goiters (swollen gland) were commonly depicted in paintings and sculptures of the era,” he said.

“Additionally, Lisa Gherardini gave birth shortly before sitting for the portrait, which indicates the possibility of peripartum thyroiditis (inflammation of the thyroid after pregnancy).”