Tag Archives: Article 50

Merkel expects Brexit deal approval

German Chancellor Angela Merkel said on November 12 that she expected Westminster to approve British Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s Article 50 deal with the European Union.

 

The United Kingdom voted by 52%-48% in 2016 to leave the EU, albeit without deciding how it would be done with or without a deal.

 

Brexit three months extension

The European Union leaders have agreed to extend the UK departure date until 31 January 2020, indirectly acknowledging that the British government will not meet the foreseen deadline on October 31.

https://twitter.com/eucopresident/status/1188748108764721152?s=21

The president of the EU Council Donald Tusk assessed the delay as “flextension“, underlining that there is no need to keep membership in the block until the date, but Britons could leave anytime before the date as soon as the Withdrawal Agreement was approved by Westminster. 

https://twitter.com/nickeardleybbc/status/1188868020569038848?s=21

The new Brexit delay has been announced amid MPs intend to vote on proposals by Prime Minister Boris Johnson for an early general election on December 12. 

The Scottish National Party (SNP)  and Liberal Democrat’s (Lib/Dem) have also proposed an election a few days earlier – on December 9. 

The UK was due to leave the EU on October 31, but PM Johnson was required to request an extension after Westminster failed to agree a Withdrawal Agreement. 

https://twitter.com/nickeardleybbc/status/1188868020569038848?s=21

Boris Johnson had repeatedly stated the UK would leave on 31 October meeting the deadline regardless the Withdrawal Agreement, but the law – known as the Benn Act – imposes to accept the EU’s extension proposal in absence of the Brexit deal.

https://twitter.com/bbcpolitics/status/1188868668182020096?s=21

The Downing Street source said to the BBC that the government would introduce a bill “almost identical” to the Lib Dem/SNP option on October 29 if Labour voted their proposal down later, and “we will have a pre-Christmas election anyway”.

UK obligation to assign EU Commissioner

According to existing. EU Treaties the UK has an obligation to assign a candidate for a Commissioner to join European Commission next mandate team. In case Britons are still members of the European Union after October 31, they have to align with their legal obligations, and join the team.

Britain will have to propose a candidate for a commissioner in the next European Commission if it still is a member of the European Union after October 31 next head of the institution Ursula von der Leyen said.

The outgoing EU executive of Jean-Claude Juncker is supposed to conclude the five-year term on October 31, although a delay is imminent because the new Commission is still missing commissioners from France, Hungary and Romania. 

Under the EU Treaty each of the 28 member-states has to delegate one commissioner. 

Ursula von der Leyen reminded the UK about the obligations the EU membership imposes on the UK government.

Germany hopes for orderly Brexit soon

Germany Foreign Minister Heiko Maas shared his hope of Westiminster lawmakers would vote to proceed with an orderly Brexit, he also confirmed his readiness for a short extension of Brexit for the lawmakers to proceed with the legislation. 

https://twitter.com/dw_politics/status/1186341381775585281?s=21

“I hope that the British lower house, showing the necessary responsibility, can take a decision on this today and that on the basis of this decision we will be in a position to achieve an orderly Brexit,” German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas. 

Should there be problems in Britain with the ratification, I would not rule out that there could be a short, technical extension,” the top diplomat added. 

Should there not be a majority in the British lower house, then we in the European Union would have to look at whether there would then be a full extension – and only then would there be a decision about that. At the moment, I don’t think it is sensible or appropriate to speculate about that.”

Westminster aims at one year Brexit delay

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson refused to negotiate further extension of Brexit deadline with the European Union, after he failed to win the support of Westminster for his Article 50 Agreement with the bloc, facing another delay caused by MP Oliver Letwin amendment. The MPs passed an amendment tabled by a cross-party group, led by Mr. Letwin by 322 votes to 306 – a majority of 16. The amendment says Parliament will withhold approval of the Prime minister’s deal until the withdrawal bill implementing Article 50 Agreement has been passed. In essence the #Letwin manoeuvre means winning time, shifting away the vote for endorsed in Brussels this week Brexit deal.

Voting down Prime Minister’s deal implies the request of a further postponement of abandoning the EU, the step Boris Johnson categorically denies, also pointing at the EU fatigue from the protracted debate on conditions of the departure.

MPs voted 322 to 306 in favour of a 26-word Letwin amendment that imposed an obligation on Prime Minister to ask the EU for a delay until the end of January 2020.

https://twitter.com/bbcpolitics/status/1185554708380839937?s=21

“And of course, the truth of it is this is all about getting a second referendum. That is what the Remainer forces in Parliament want. And the more time they buy, the more chance they’ve got of getting something like that passed. 

“So you know, we’ve got this odd situation that goes on and on and on. A Remain Parliament and a Leave country and it’s just the most awful situation.

“I feel in the absence of a general election, nothing is going to improve” said Member of the European Parliament, and the leader of Brexit party Nigel Farage in his comment to LBC TV after the vote.

The representative of the European Parliament at Brexit talks. Guy Verhofstadt wrote: “The @Europarl_EN’s Brexit Steering Group will consider the outcome of today’s vote for the Letwin amendment on Monday. Whatever happens next, the marches outside the Parliament show just how important a close EU – UK future relationship is”.

The EU spokesperson said the European Commission took a note of the vote supporting Letwin amendment. “It will be for the UK government to inform us about the next steps as soon as possible” she added.

https://twitter.com/eucopresident/status/1185628435554734080?s=21


The president of the European Council had a telephone
conversation with Prime Minister Johnson, and is awaiting an official letter, informing the EU about the situation in the Westminster.

Judges rule Westminster prorogation “unlawful”

The United Kingdom’s Supreme Court ruled on September 24 that Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s decision to shut down parliament in the run-up to Brexit was unlawful, pushing the process of Britain’s exit from the European Union deeper into turmoil.

The unanimous decision by the court’s 11 judges undermines Johnson and gives legislators more scope to oppose his promise to leave the  EU on October 31. Opposition leaders demanded that he should resign immediately.

The decision to advise Her Majesty to prorogue parliament was unlawful because it had the effect of frustrating or preventing the ability of parliament to carry out its constitutional functions without reasonable justification,” Supreme Court President Brenda Hale said, reading out the milestone document.

 

Europarl Sassoli invited to London

European Parliament President David Sassoli today received a phone call from UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson. It was the first conversation between the two leaders.

Prime Minister Johnson invited president Sassoli to meet in person in London and stressed the importance of the European Parliament in the Brexit process. He expressed his wish to find a positive agreement on the United Kingdom departure from the European Union. President Sassoli responded that this was also the wish of the bloc of EU27.

The call followed the approval of a new Brexit resolution which reaffirmed the European Parliament’s support for an orderly and managed Brexit. President Sassoli stressed in the call that Parliament’s priorities remain guaranteeing citizens’ rights and protecting the peace process in Northern Ireland. He also reiterated that any agreement will need to be approved by both the UK and European Parliament, so robust debate and parliamentary scrutiny is essential. The European institutions are ready to discuss any written proposal from the UK government to unblock the current impasse.

« Older Entries