Tag Archives: Julian Assange

Mélenchon: Assange French citizenship

Brussels 19.06.2022 Jean-Luc Mélenchon, leader of France’s left coalition NUPES: “If I’m Prime Minister on Monday, Julian will be a naturalised French citizen and we will ask for him to be sent to us. Mr. Assange should be decorated for his services to the French people.”

While the UK Home Secretary Prity Patel approved the extradition of the WikiLeaks co-founder Julian Assange to the US, France’s far-left leader Jean-Luc Mélenchon promises grant him French nationality if he’s appointed Prime minister.

The British Home Secretary Priti Patel on Friday, Juin 17, approved the extradition of WikiLeaks founder and whistleblower Julian Assange to the U.S.

Last December, the U.K. The High Court in London ruled that Assange could be extradited from Britain to the U.S. to face espionage charges. This week the Home Office has signed the extradition order for Assange, which means that he could be sentenced for 175 in the State of Virginia, and as political prisoner vanish forever behind the barbed wire in “gulag”.

In a statement, a Home Office spokesperson said: “In this case, the UK courts have not found that it would be oppressive, unjust or an abuse of process to extradite Mr Assange. Nor have they found that extradition would be incompatible with his human rights, including his right to a fair trial and to freedom of expression, and that whilst in the US he will be treated appropriately, including in relation to his health.”

Assange at edge of extradition

Brussels 18.06.2022 Wikileaks founder Julian Assange extradition to the U.S. has been approved by UK Home Secretary Priti Patel.

Mr Assange has 14 days to appeal over the decision, the Home Office confirmed.

Previously the British courts found extradition would not be “incompatible with his human rights” and that while in the U.S. “he will be treated appropriately”.

Julian Assange is wanted by the American authorities over documents leaked in 2010 and 2011, which the US says broke the law and endangered lives.

The Wikileaks documents related to the war crimes during Iraq and Afghanistan wars.

The Australian is being held at Belmarsh prison in London after mounting a lengthy battle to avoid being extradited.

Extradition allows one country to ask another to hand over a suspect to face trial.

Responding to the home secretary’s order, Wikileaks confirmed it would appeal against her decision.

Assange’s spouse, Stella, said her husband had done “nothing wrong” and “he has committed no crime”.

“He is a journalist and a publisher, and he is being punished for doing his job,” she declared.

In a press conference outside the British Embassy in New York, his brother Gabriel Shipton said they would take his appeal to the European Court of Human Rights if not successful in the UK’s High Court.

Media company Wikileaks is a whistle-blowing platform that publishes classified material provided by anonymous sources.

Epilogue: human rights 1948-2021

Brussels 11.12.2021 Brussels 11.12.2021 On 10 December, every year, we mark the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948. This year’s theme “Reducing inequalities, advancing human rights” is particularly important as the pandemic and its socio-economic consequences have a growing negative impact on human rights, democracy and the rule of law, including on civic space. They further deepen pre-existing inequalities and increase pressure on persons in vulnerable situations and challenge human rights globally.

Human rights, democracy and the rule of law are at the heart of the EU’s response to and recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic. Investing in human rights, democracy, the rule of law and enabling civic space is essential to achieving and rebuilding better societies for present and future generations. No one should be left behind, no human right ignored. The EU recalls that any restrictions to human rights in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic must be strictly necessary, proportionate, temporary in nature and non-discriminatory.

Human Rights Day reminds us that human rights are universal, indivisible, inalienable, interdependent and interrelated. It reminds us, however, that these rights cannot be taken for granted and that they must be continuously defended. The EU will continue to uphold the universality of human rights and exercise vigilance against any attempt to undermine international commitments. On Human Rights Day, we commit to re-double our efforts to stand with and speak out for the oppressed and those under threat, wherever they may live. Our solidarity and support goes out in particular to civil society actors and human rights defenders including those with whom we engaged at the EU NGO Human Rights Forum on 7-8 December.

Throughout 2021, under the Action Plan on Human Rights and Democracy 2020-2024, the EU has continued to reinforce global action to defend and reinvigorate human rights around the world, making full use of our unique range of instruments. For the first time, the EU has imposed sanctions on persons and entities from China, DPRK, Libya, South Sudan, Eritrea and Russia involved in serious human rights violations and abuses, under the EU Global Human Rights Sanctions Regime adopted last year. Furthermore, in 2021 the EU took the lead in United Nations Human Rights fora on initiatives aimed at addressing human rights violations in Afghanistan, Belarus, Burundi, DPRK, Ethiopia, Eritrea and Myanmar.

The EU also further expanded concrete support to civil society organisations and human rights defenders to advance human rights and democracy worldwide through a specific thematic programme, amounting to over €1.5 billion for the period 2021-2027, reaffirming its role as world leader in this field.
Achieving human rights is not only an imperative of human dignity; it is a cornerstone of democracy, peace and security, and sustainable development.

Wikileaks Assange closer to extradition

Brussels 10.12.2021 WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange appeared to be a step closer to facing criminal charges in the United States for one of the major leaks of classified information after Washington won an appeal over his extradition in an English court.

U.S. authorities accuse Australian-born Assange, 50, of 18 counts relating to WikiLeaks’ release of vast troves of confidential U.S. military records and diplomatic cables which they said had put lives in danger.

Assange’s supporters profile him as an anti-establishment hero who has been persecuted by the United States for exposing U.S. wrongdoing and double-dealing across the world from Afghanistan and Iraq to Washington.

At the Royal Courts of Justice in London, the United States won an appeal against a ruling by a London District Judge that Assange should not be extradited because he was likely to commit suicide in a U.S.
prison.
Back in A cross-group of MEPs are calling on the European Commission to intervene and stop the extradition of Julian Assange from the UK to the US.

The letter, signed by 37 MEPs – including 32 from the Left – deplores the US request to prosecute the founder of Wikileaks, and it underlines the importance of the right to information as a fundamental pillar of our democracy.

MEPs shared the UN Special Rapporteur on Torture Nils Melzer’s grave concerns that the extradition would put Assange at risk of cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.

Assange marriage at Belmarsh prison

Brussels 12.11.2021 Julian Assange has been granted permission to marry his long term partner Stella Moris in Belmarsh prison, the BBC has been told. The Wikileaks founder and Moris have two young children together. Their love story flourished in Ecuador Embassy. The prison service said Assange’s application was “considered in the usual way by the prison governor”.

“Good news: UK government has backed down 24h before the deadline.
“Julian and I now have permission to marry in Belmarsh prison.
“I am relieved but still angry that legal action was necessary to put a stop to the illegal interference with our basic right to marry”, Assange bride Stellar Morris wrote on her Twitter blog.

Assange, 50, continues to fight extradition to the U.S. on espionage charges. He is wanted on allegations of conspiracy to obtain and disclose national defence information, following Wikileaks’ publication of hundreds of thousands of leaked documents relating to the Afghanistan and Iraq wars.

The publications include the release in April 2010 of footage showing US soldiers shooting and killing civilians from a helicopter in Iraq.

The Australian has been in Belmarsh Prison since 2019, when he was carried out of the Ecuadorian Embassy in London by police and arrested formally for breaching his bail conditions.

Assange detention degrades UK press freedom

The UK has dropped two places to 35th out of 180 countries in Reporters Without Borders’ (RSF’s) 2020 World Press Freedom Index, published today. Although the UK government played a key role in promoting media freedom globally, its efforts were undermined by domestic developments, including the murder of Lyra McKee and active threats to the safety of journalists in Northern Ireland, and the detention of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange, who faces possible extradition to the US.

The sentencing of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange to a disproportionate jail term of 50 weeks for breaking bail also marred the UK’s press freedom record in 2019, as did the Home Office’s decision to green light the US extradition request. Assange remained in custody at the high security Belmarsh Prison despite widespread international concern for his health and safety, including by the UN Special Rapporteur on Torture.

“With coronavirus and other converging crises presenting unprecedented threats to press freedom globally, it is more important than ever for democratic states to lead by example. The UK should be performing better on the World Press Freedom Index, and must address these domestic concerns as a matter of priority. Concrete steps should be taken to ensure the safety of journalists in the wake of Lyra McKee’s murder, and Julian Assange should be released – and certainly not extradited to the US”, said RSF UK Bureau Director Rebecca Vincent.

RSF also noted concern over problematic provisions of counter-terrorism and crime legislation adopted in 2019, as well as the pursuit by the London Metropolitan Police of the publication of leaked information from diplomatic cables as a criminal matter.

The Index ranks 180 countries and regions according to the level of freedom available to journalists. It is a snapshot of the media freedom situation based on an evaluation of pluralism, independence of the media, quality of legislative framework and safety of journalists in each country and region. It does not rank public policies even if governments obviously have a major impact on their country’s ranking. Nor is it an indicator of the quality of journalism in each country or region.

Assange court hearing in 2020

The full extradition hearing to decide whether Wikileaks founder Julian Assange (47) should be handed to the United States to face accusations including spying charges will take place in February next year, a London court ruled.Assange faces 18 counts in the U.S. including conspiring to hack government computers and violating an espionage law. He could spend decades in prison if convicted, higley likely facing torture in CIA prisons, and also possibly an death penalty.

“Ithttps://twitter.com/guengl/status/1139439176338690049?s=21 is important that people aren’t fooled into believing that WikiLeaks is anything but a publisher,” said Assange, who appeared by videolink from a London prison, dressed in a grey T-shirt and wearing black-framed glasses.

The U.S. government has tried to mislead the press,” he told Westminster Magistrates’ Court.

UK Javid singed Assange extradition to US

British Home Secretary Sajid Javid  informed press about his signature of an extradition order to send WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange (47) to the United States.

https://twitter.com/Ruptly/status/1138518762234056704

Javid  explained that the decision on Assange’s extradition would be made on June 14 in a court, however an appeal from the part of the defendant is expected.

https://twitter.com/RT_com/status/1139096031277174784

Assange faces an 18-count indictment in the United States that accuses him of soliciting and publishing classified military information and conspiring with former U.S. Army Private Chelsea Manning to crack the password of a U.S. Defense Department computer.

The indictment, issued by the U.S. Justice Department in May, includes charges under the Espionage Act.

Assange was evicted on April 11 from the Embassy of Equador in London, where he had been sheltering since 2012 after he was granted a political asylum.

British police and is currently serving a 50-week sentence for breach the conditions of the bail.

https://twitter.com/WISEUpAction/status/1138053443963236352

Swedish prosecution has re-opened a case of alleged rape against him, requesting the questioning, which Assange has agreed to do with the investigators visiting him in the UK to avoid risks of extradition to the U.S.

The scale of the WikiLeaks leak was huge – 750,000 classified and unclassified but sensitive military, and diplomatic documents were released in 2010.

It was one of the first mass releases of secret documents, exposing American war crimes in Iraq and Afghanistan and on a different scale to anything WikLeaks had done before.

 

UN: Assange “tortured psychologically”

Julian Assange has suffered “prolonged exposure to psychological torture“, the UN’s torture expert Nils Melzer said.

Nils Melzer urged the UK not to extradite the Wikileaks founder, warning that his human rights would be violated and that he is not fit to stand trial.

UN expert also accused “several democratic states” of a “concerted effort” to break Assange will.

But the UK foreign secretary Jeremy Hunt argued that Assange chose to hide” from justice.

In a tweet Jeremy Hunt said Nils Melzershould allow British courts to make their judgements without his interference or inflammatory accusations”.

 

Manning denied release on bail

Former US Army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning will remain in prison after a federal appeals court denied her request to be released on bail, and upheld a lower court’s decision to hold Manning in civil contempt for refusing to give evidence before grand jury.

The ruling is a blow to Manning, who was arrested in March after  declining to answer questions in connection with the government’s long-running investigation into Wikileaks and its Australian founder Julian Assange.

In a comment released by a spokesperson, Manning said that while disappointing, the appeals court ruling will still allow to “raise issues as the government continues to abuse the grand jury process”.

I don’t have anything to contribute to this, or any other grand jury,” Manning added.

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