Tag Archives: Boris Johnson

EU-UK Sunday talks continue

Brussels 13.12.2020 British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said that he will “continue talking” with the EU in an attempt to reach a trade deal, but that leaving without one and trading in future on World Trade Organization (WTO) terms is more likely.

The European commission president, Ursula von der Leyen, and the UK prime minister have agreed that trade talks should continue, and she called the exchange of opinions on telephone this morning “useful”.

Prime Minister has underlined that both parties had described the discussions as “constructive and useful”, in a moving away from their previous terms of “lively and interesting”. The joint statement was a sign they were working to try to find a way forward together, he added.

EU-UK: preparations for no-deal

Brussels 10.12.2020 In spite of the considerable efforts of the negotiators “very large gaps remain” between the UK and EU, despite talks in persona between Boris Johnson, who came to Brussels, and EU to executive Ursula von der Leyen aimed at breaking the Brexit trade deadlock, according to No 10 spokesperson.

President of the European Commission Ursula von der Leyen said the two sides were still “far apart“. Meanwhile talks between the UK’s chief negotiator Lord Frost and the EU’s Michel Barnier will resume in Brussels. However British Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said it was “unlikely” the negotiations would be extended beyond December 13, Sunday.

After their meeting, the British Prime minister and European Commission president “agreed that by Sunday a firm decision should be taken about the future of the talks”, a No 10 spokesperson added.

In view of the looming no-deal on Thursday morning, the EU set out the measures it would implement in the event of a no-deal scenario.

The plan includes allowing aviation safety certificates to continue to apply to avoid the grounding of aircraft.

“The EU will “never sacrifice (its) future” to conclude a post-Brexit agreement at the cost of concessions that would weaken its single market, warned European negotiator Michel Barnier, while negotiations between Brussels and London are deadlocked.

Boris Johnson travels to Brussels

Brussels 08.12.2020 British Prime Minister Boris Johnson will travel to Brussels for a summit in persona with the European commission president, Ursula von der Leyen, in an attempt to reach a breakthrough in the EU-UK stalled negotiations.

A long-awaited decisive meeting will be held in the “coming days”, the two leaders said in a joint statement following a phone call lasting over an hour, to ensure the agreement on a trade and security. The diplomatic sources on both sides pointed to 9-10 December as the most likely dates.

However none of the diplomats expressed certainty about the sealing of the deal. There is also a backdrop of pessimism among the experts, presuming this “gesticulation” is mere attempt to convince the electorates at both side of the Channel in sincere attempt to reach a results.

“Talks are in the same position now as they were on Friday,” a UK government source said, referring to the December 4. “We have made no tangible progress. It’s clear this must now continue politically. Whilst we do not consider this process to be closed, things are looking very tricky and there’s every chance we are not going to get there.”

Brexit: no-deal looming

Brussels 04.12.2020 “After one week of intense negotiations in London, together with
David Frost, we agreed today that the conditions for an agreement are not met, due to significant divergences on level playing field, governance and fisheries” the EU top negotiator Michel Barnier wrote on his Twitter account.

“We agreed to pause the talks in order to brief our Principals on the state of play of the negotiations. President von der Leyen, and Prime Minister Johnson will discuss the state of play tomorrow afternoon” Barnier informed. The similar announcement made the UK sherpa David Frost on his micro blog.

After a long period of the negotiations, shifting from one deadlock to another, there is little hope left to see the deal done. There is also little expectation for last minute “miracle” solution patching the differences. There is no hope in the last minute mending done by Boris Johnson and Ursula von der Leyen who would meet on have talks on December 7.

EU-UK: no-deal looming

Brussels 16.10.2020 The British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said that it was time to prepare for a UK exit from the European Union without a negotiated deal (so called no-deal scenario) on their future relationship unless there is a drastic change in the bloc’s position. (Image: archive).

In the aftermath of statements by European Council President Charles Michel who has underlined that it was up to London to make compromises to avoid a disorderly break-up on January 1, Boris Johnson felt that the continuation of the negotiations planned for next week in London was now unnecessary .

The UK officially left the EU on January 31 but remains subject to EU rules during a transition that runs until the end of the year, while the two sides agree on their future relationship and avoid the “leap into the void” of a brutal Brexit.

“Unless there is a fundamental change of approach, we are moving towards the Australian-style solution and we must do so with great confidence,” said Boris Johnson, referring to relations between Australia and the EU, which are not supported by any extended bilateral free trade agreement.

His spokesperson hit the nail on the head hours later when he said that talks between Brussels and London for a trade deal on their future relationship were over. He added that EU chief negotiator Michel Barnier was only due to visit London next week if the bloc’s approach changed.

“The trade negotiations are over: the EU has put an end to them de facto by saying that it does not want to change its negotiating position,” he said. The various announcements by the British government have caused movements of fluctuation up and down on the pound.

Asked if he is now staying away from the talks, Boris Johnson said: “If there is a fundamental change in approach, of course we are always ready to listen, but it has not. seemed particularly encouraging at the Brussels summit. ”

“They (the Europeans) want to keep the ability to continue to control our legislative freedom, our fishing activities, in a way that is obviously unacceptable to an independent country,” he added.

Before Boris Johnson’s spokesman said Brexit talks were over, the EU said the European Commission intended to continue seeking a deal, considering the UK PM’s comments to be rhetoric.

#EUCO: EU-UK future relations at stake

Brussels 13.10.2020 Today the EU chief negotiator Michel Barnier has informed the EU Ministers on the state of play of talks between the block and the UK, and the implementation of the Withdrawal Agreement. He also confirmed the “strong EU unity” ahead of European Council on October 15-16. Barnier added that the EU will continue to work for a fair deal in the coming days and weeks.

Ahead of the Council European Council President Charles Michel has called the British government to put “all cards on the table” respecting to Brexit Withdrawal Agreement. “To get to a deal, we need significant steps by our British friends in the coming days”, he added.

“We have given a very strong signal to the British government: If the Finance Bill is introduced with that provision in it, many in the EU will see that as an indication that the British government simply doesn’t want a deal. It would be a second piece of legislation designed to deliberately break the Withdrawal Agreement text”.

With the 15 October European Council date approaching, the negotiations between the EU and the UK are becoming more intense to meet the deadline.

Michel Barnier next travelled to London to meet with UK Chief Negotiator David Frost, while informal talks continued this past week. European Council President Charles Michel and Prime Minister Johnson spoke by phone on 7 October to discuss the progress of the intensified negotiations ahead of the 15 October Summit.

Since UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson and European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen’s joint statement over the weekend, EU Chief Negotiator Michel Barnier travelled to Berlin on Monday to meet with German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas.

The latter stressed the pandemic has made the negotiations with the UK even more difficult. Regardless of this hurdle, Maas added a no-deal Brexit would be “irresponsible”, saying the EU remains open to establishing a “close and ambitious partnership” with the UK. He warned, however, that progress is needed at this stage of the talks on state aid, the Irish border and dispute resolution.

Meanwhile, the UK Government announced its intention to push through a Finance Bill (not yet published) for approval by the end of the year could prove problematic for achieving a deal with the EU. The Bill is expected to include clauses which would allow the UK Government to make unilateral decisions about which goods were “at risk” of being traded on from Northern Ireland into the EU, and should therefore be subject to tariffs. The EU argues that this would be a further breach the Withdrawal Agreement and may therefore risk a no-deal exit scenario.

On October 7 in a separate procedure the Scottish Parliament voted to withhold consent on the UK’s Internal Market Bill. Both the Scottish and Welsh governments have stated the Bill overrides their powers of administration.

EU-UK: attempt to bridge gaps

The President of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen, and the UK Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, spoke today about the state of play in the negotiations on the future relationship between the UK and the EU.

They agreed on the importance of finding an agreement, if at all possible, as a strong basis for a strategic EU-UK relationship in future.

They endorsed the assessment of both Chief Negotiators that progress had been made in recent weeks but that significant gaps remained, notably but not only in the areas of fisheries, the level playing field, and governance.

They instructed their Chief Negotiators to work intensively in order to try to bridge those gaps.

They agreed to speak on a regular basis on this issue.

Brexit: EU intensifies negotiations

The post-Brexit trade talks remained deadlocked on key areas, as London urged Brussels to give ground to avoid a damaging “no-deal” at the end of the year. They have pinpointed a European summit to October 15 as the latest agreement could be reached for it to be ratified in time for it take effect at the end of the year.

However the EU’s chief negotiator Michel Barnier and his UK counterpart David Frost complained of a continued gulf between the two sides in crucial areas such as competition rules and fishing rights.

After the ninth round of talks in the difficult process broke up in Brussels, with renewed commitments to find a way out of the impasse, there was clear acknowledgement the deadline approaches.

“To reach an agreement, these divergences must necessarily be overcome over the next weeks,” said Barnier.

Despite indicating there were signs of agreement in a number of areas, Frost warned disagreements over competition rules and fishing may be “impossible” to overcome without the EU giving ground.

“I am concerned that there is very little time now to resolve these issues ahead of the European Council on October 15,” he said.

Next steps may be determined on October 3 in a video conference between European Commission chief Ursula von der Leyen and Britain’s Prime Minister Boris Johnson.

Prime Minister Johnson said it was up to Brussels to agree to terms to unblock a deal.

“It’s all there, it’s just up to them,” he told the BBC, urging the EU to bow to common sense.

UK and EU officials have underlined the two leaders would take stock of progress made in the latest round of talks even as the European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen warned against a deal “at any price”.

“This is so difficult, but overall where there is a will there is a way. I think we should intensify the negotiations,” the EU top executive told press after meeting leaders of the 27-member bloc.

EU “firm” on respecting Brexit deal

Brussels 21.09.2020 According to an EU official the president of the EU Council Charles Michel met with top EU-UK negotiator Michel Barnier today to discuss a number of issues concerning the ongoing talks with the United Kingdom on the comprehensive trade agreement. The central focus has been the state of play of the negotiations, especially regarding the intention of the British Prime Minister Boris Johnson to re-write the Withdrawal Agreement unilaterally.

PM Johnson defends his plan to unilaterally rewrite Britain’s Brexit deal with the European Union as an insurance policy against the bloc’s unreasonable behaviour — even as his former attorney general joined the ranks of once-loyal lawmakers refusing the contentious move.
Regarding the situation the EU official said that the position of the bloc remains “firm and steady” towards the need to fully implement the Withdrawal Agreement. The EU will not be “intimidated nor impressed”, but still the breaking of the international agreement remains “extremely worrying”.
Meanwhile Michel Barnier is also to preparing the briefing for the heads of states and governments of the EU member-states at special European Council on September 24-25, reporting on analysis of the situation.
At present the EU is looking for an agreement on our future relation, but that requires substantial progress on key issues as level playing field and fisheries, the EU official has underlined.

#SoTEU: Leyen WARNS UK

The UK has no legal power to unilaterally set aside the Brexit Withdrawal Agreement signed by Boris Johnson, European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen has warned in her State of Union #SOTEU speech on September 16. In the traditional annual address of the president of the European Commission to the European Parliament. The president said both sides had agreed it was the only way to guarantee the Northern Ireland peace process. In her speech she insisted that the trust would be undermined if the UK started reverse its international Treaty obligations.
Ursula von der Leyen addressed issue of the Withdrawal Agreement, which was concluded as a direct result of Brexit.

“We need new beginnings with old friends – on both of sides of the Atlantic and on both sides of the Channel. The scenes in this very room when we held hands and said goodbye with Auld Lang Syne spoke a thousand words. They showed an affection for the British people that will never fade. But with every day that passes the chances of a timely agreement do start to fade. Negotiations are always difficult. We are used to that.
And the Commission has the best and most experienced negotiator, Michel Barnier, to navigate us through.
But talks have not progressed as we would have wished. And that leaves us very little time.

As ever, this House will be the first to know and will have the last say. And I can assure you we will continue to update you throughout, just as we did with the Withdrawal Agreement.That agreement took three years to negotiate and we worked relentlessly on it. Line by line, word by word. And together we succeeded. The result guarantees our citizens’ rights, financial interests, the integrity of the Single Market – and crucially the Good Friday Agreement.

“The EU and the UK jointly agreed it was the best and only way for ensuring peace on the island of Ireland.
And we will never backtrack on that. This agreement has been ratified by this House and the House of Commons.
It cannot be unilaterally changed, disregarded or dis-applied. This a matter of law, trust and good faith.
And that is not just me saying it – I remind you of the words of Margaret Thatcher: “Britain does not break Treaties. It would be bad for Britain, bad for relations with the rest of the world, and bad for any future Treaty on trade”. This was true then, and it is true today.
Trust is the foundation of any strong partnership” von der Leyen said.

Boris Johnson has urged MPs to support a bill which modifies the Brexit deal he signed with the EU in January. While the British Prime Minister said the Internal Markets Bill would “ensure the integrity of the UK internal market” and hand power to Scotland and Wales, and it would protect the Northern Ireland peace process. Critics insist that the move will damage the UK’s international standing after a minister admitted the plans break international law.

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