Tag Archives: Westminster

Johnson: forced to delay Brexit again

Westminster including a number of former Conservatives expelled from the party, are preparing legal action in case the Prime Minister Boris Johnson refuses to request Brussels to delay Brexit beyond October 31.

A bill imposing to request an extension of the UK‘s departure date to avoid a no-deal Brexit on 31 October is set to gain royal assent.

But the PM has said he would “rather be dead in a ditch” than ask for a delay.

Now the Members of Parliament have formed a legal team and are willing to go to court to enforce the legislation, if necessary.

The cross-party bill – which requires the Prime minister to extend the Brexit deadline to next year (January 2020) unless Parliament agrees a deal with the EU by 19 October – was approved on Friday.

However the bill requires approval from Queen Elizabeth II. The government of Prime Minister Boris Johnson stands firmly against this initiative, and vows  to deliver Brexit according to the referendum results, in full respect of democracy.

Johnson vows to deliver Brexit on 31/10

Today British Prime minister Boris Johnson made a short statement to confirm his determination to exit the EU on October 31. However he expressed hope there would be a deal by then. He also criticized the opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn for his tactic of permanent delays of the departure date. (Image above: archive).

The government led by Johnson is expected to table a motion to hold a general election on 14 October in case the Remainers MPs would get majority in opposing no-deal exit.

Boris Johnson said he did not wish a snap election, but he does not see other ways to progress, breaking the deadlock.

Brexit: Queen approves suspension of Parliament

Queen approves Boris Johnson’s request to droop UK Parliament. (Image: archive).

Boris Johnson asked Queen to suspend UK Parliament ahead of Brexit.

The European Parliament representative for Brexit talks Guy Verhofstad expressed his disappointment with the decision of the UK Parliament suspension.

May steps down on 7 June

Prime Minister Theresa May has announced she will resign as Conservative Party leader on 7 June, under mounting pressure to quit facing a backlash from her own MPs against her Brexit plan. Until present the Westminster has rejected  May‘s government withdrawal agreement or otherwise called “Brexit deal” three times.

May attempts to get Brexit deal before summer break

In June British Prime Minister Theresa May will undertake one more effort to receive the endorsement for her Brexit deal from the Westminster before the summer break, setting a new deadline for her exit from the EU plan and a potential timetable for her own departure.

Brexit had been due to take place on March 29, but May government was unable to get her departure deal (WA) approved by the House of Commons, which rejected the so-called Withdrawal Agreement (WA) three times. As a crisis response the EU offered delay to 31 October, an absolute deadline before the start of a new institutional cycle: from November onward the procedure of the appointment of new European commissioners should start. According to the EU Treaty the UK will be obliged to appoint a Commissioner to Brussels if it is still a member of the European Union by November 2019.

May’s leadership at stake

Conservative Party will demand a clear Brexit timetable for Prime Minister Theresa May’s departure plan but will not change the rules governing leadership challenge.

May survived a confidence vote in December last year and under the party’s rules cannot be challenged again for next 12 months. But many of the party’s lawmakers and members have become increasingly frustrated over her handling of Brexit and have called for a way to force her out sooner.

However the executive of the so-called 1922 Committee of Conservative lawmakers, met on April 22-23 to discuss whether to change the leadership rules.

We determined there should not be a rule change to remove the 12 month period of grace during which a second confidence vote cannot be held,Graham Brady, the committee’s chair, told reporters after the meeting.

 

UK government opposes II Brexit referendum

The idea of a second Brexit referendum is very likely to be voted again in Westminster although the government remains opposed to the second plebiscite on the same issue of leaving the European Union, the British finance minister said.

I remain optimistic that over the next couple of months we will get a deal done,” he told reporters in Washington where he is attending meetings at the International Monetary Fund.

Philip Hammond said he hoped parliament would break the Brexit deadlock by passing a deal by the end of June, potentially ending the calls for a new referendum, and there was a “good chance” of a breakthrough in talks with the opposition Labour Party.

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