Tag Archives: Wine

Ruinart Champagne and Cécile Gray design

Brussels 02.06.2021 “The gesture and the patience are common points between the one who works the vine and the craftsman who works the material” – French designer Cécile Gray said.

This month, Ruinart Studio invites Cécile Gray to imagine a beautiful, yet useful creation reusing Ruinart’s materials. The former architect chose to focus on the cork wire and poetically demonstrates the value of each element that contributes to savouring champagne.

At the intersection of different disciplines – basketry, jewelry making, weaving and embroidery – and with an heightened sense of detail, Cécile Gray delicately assembled the muselets that hold the champagne cork in place, forming a picnic basket.

Enjoy summer with Ruinart champagne

Have you ever tasted Ruinart champagnes?
Ruinart Champagne Cellar Master, Frédéric Panaoitis, created for you e-tasting videos.
Discover the perfect combination of freshness and exotic notes, Ruinart Rosé.
Ruinart rosé is the first rosé champagne to make its appearance over 250 years ago, its excellent quality remains the essential feature of the production of this delicate wine to this day.

The House of Ruinart was officially founded in 1729, as it was only on the 25th May 1728 that a royal decree authorized the transport of champagne wine in baskets containing 50 or 100 bottles. Prior to that date wines could only be transported in casks. Therefore the right to transport bottles opened up the market throughout France and even further afield for the wine merchants in Reims.

After a glorious past and a number of vicissitudes, RUINART has joined the LVMH luxury group and has since become one of the most appreciated and respected champagne brands in France.

Ruinart is currently managed by Frédéric Dufour and its Cellar Master is Frédéric Panaïotis. The House sells an estimated 3 million bottles per year.

Ruinart champagnes are characterized by an unusually high percentage of Chardonnay in the blends, resulting in a fine freshness and elegance, with a certain power.

Extraordinary vintage Dom Ruinart 2007

2007 is an extraordinary vintage, and one of the very few in Champagne when the harvest began in August. After a sunny and very warm spring, the months of June, July and August brought rather gloomy weather and heavy rainfall. The blend is 100% Chardonnay exclusively from Grand Cru vineyards.

The blend is 100% Chardonnay exclusively from Grand Cru vineyards: 75% from the Côte des Blancs (Chouilly, Le Mesnil, Oger and Avize) and 25% from the northern slopes of Montagne de Reims (predominantly Sillery and Verzenay).

The attack is a hit of chalk, then flint and oyster shell notes mingle with the smoky aromas of blond tobacco. The nose continues into springtime notes, underscored with light aromas of sap, linden, acacia, extremely fresh yellow and green citrus fruit (lime, yuzu) and green fruit (plum). The subtle notes of fig leaf, liquorice and fine Chinese tea enhance the complexity of its aromatic bouquet.
The palate, which begins smoothly, quickly reveals a thrilling, stony liveliness and a deep intensity structured by notes of green citrus and grapefruit. The sap-infused and chalky finish is framed with an elegant bitter flavour. Dom Ruinart 2007 is a dynamic, sculpted wine that expresses the full purity of fine Chardonnay.

For a starter, Dom Ruinart is a wonderful match for a carpaccio of scallops millefeuille and black radish with a marinade of first press organic olive oil and green citrus fruit. Its elegance and texture partners perfectly with steamed cod in champagne, Zhegiang powder tea and a seawater consommé.
Dom Ruinart Blanc de Blancs 2007 has to be kept in a cool place, away from any light. Serving this vintage at a temperature between 10 and 12°C in large tasting glasses will accentuate the sublime nature of its aromatic complexity.

GIs sales value of €75bln

Agri-food and drink products whose names are protected by the European Union as “Geographical Indications” (GIs) represent a sales value of €74.76 billion, according to a study published today by the European Commission. Over one fifth of this amount results from exports outside the European Union. The study found that the sales value of a product with a protected name is on average double that for similar products without a certification.

“European Geographical Indications reflect the wealth and diversity of products that our agricultural sector has to offer. Producers’ benefits are clear. They can sell products at a higher value, to consumers looking for authentic regional products. GIs are a key aspect of our trade agreements. By protecting products across the globe, we prevent fraudulent use of product names and we preserve the good reputation of European agri-food and drink products. Geographical Indications protect local value at global level”, Commissioner for Agriculture, Janusz Wojciechowski, said.

European food is famous for being safe, nutritious and of high quality. Traditional production methods contribute to the EU objective to also become the global standard for sustainability in food production.

EU quality schemes aim at protecting the names of specific products to promote their unique characteristics, linked to their geographical origin as well as know-how embedded in the region.

These product names are part of the EU system of intellectual property rights, legally protecting them against imitation and misuse. Agri-food products and wines are protected as Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) and Protected Geographical Indication (PGI), and spirit drinks as Geographical Indications (GI). European Union also protects Traditional Specialities Guaranteed (TSG), highlighting the traditional aspects of a product without being linked to a specific geographical area. The sales value of agricultural products and foodstuffs labelled as TSG are worth €2.3 billion.

The study was based on all 3,207 product names protected across the 28 EU Member States at the end of 2017 (by the end of March 2020, the total number of protected names increased to 3,322). It concludes that the sales value of a product with a protected name is on average double than that for similar products without a certification.

According to the study, there is a clear economic benefit for producers in terms of marketing and increase of sales thanks to high quality and reputation of these products, and willingness of consumers to pay to get the authentic product.

The main findings of the study are:

Significant sales value: Geographical indications and traditional specialities guaranteed all together accounted for an estimated sales value of €77.15 billion in 2017, 7% of the total sales value of the European food and drink sector estimated at €1,101 billion in 2017. Wines represented more than half of this value (€39.4 billion), agricultural products and foodstuffs 35% (€27.34 billion), and spirit drinks 13% (€10.35 billion). Out of the 3,207 product names that were registered in 2017 (both GI and TSG), 49% were wines, 43% agri-food products and 8% spirits drinks.

Higher sales premium for protected products: the sales value of the products covered by the study was on average double than the sales value for similar products without a certification. The value premium rate stood at 2.85 for wines, 2.52 for spirits and 1.5 for agricultural products and foodstuffs.

A truly European policy: Each EU country produces products whose names are protected at EU level and serve as flagships for the traditional culinary heritage of regions and as economic drivers for the national agri-food sector.

Exports of geographical indications: geographical indications represent 15.5% of the total EU agri-food exports. Wines remained the most important product both in terms of total sales value (51%) and extra-EU trade (50%). The U.S., China and Singapore are the first destinations for EU GI products, accounting for half of the export value of GI products.

To ensure that the EU quality policy continues to deliver at its best, an online public consultation was launched from 4 November 2019 to 3 February 2020 to gather feedback on the policy from stakeholders. Among the key findings, a majority of respondents agreed that EU quality schemes benefit producers and consumers. The ‘factual summary’ report gives a detailed overview of the feedback received from the public consultation.

COVID19: Italy wine fair cancelled

The novel virus outbreak has heavily disrupted daily life in Italy’s most affluent and productive regions, with schools closed and many public events canceled including world famous fashion shows and top-flight football matches.

Vinitaly, one of the world’s largest wine fairs that is held annually in the northern city of Verona, announced on March 3 it was postponing the 2020 edition from April to June.

Industry lobby Confindustria forecast on March 3 that the economy, which was already teetering on the edge of recession before the outbreak, would contract in both the first and second quarters of this year.

National Health Institute chief Silvio Brusaferro urged Italians to wash their hands frequently, remain at least a meter apart, refrain from hugging each other and avoid crowded places.

EU-China protect GI products

European Commission announced it has reached a landmark agreement with China to protect 100 European Geographical Indication (GI) products, including 26 Italian ones, in China and 100 Chinese GI in the EU.

https://twitter.com/philhoganeu/status/1192461158504128514?s=21

The emblematic Italian food products such as Barolo wine, Prosciutto di Parma ham and Grana Padano cheese will now have greater protection from imitation on the wast Chinese market.

Among the Chinese products to feature in the agreement are Pixian Dou Ban (Pixian Bean Paste), Anji Bai Cha (Anji White Tea), Panjin Da Mi (Panjin rice) and Anqiu Da Jiang (Anqiu Ginger).
Four years after coming into force, the scope of the agreement will continue to expand to cover an additional 175 GI names from the EU and China.

https://twitter.com/winesolutions1/status/1191731814634807296?s=21

European Geographic Indication products are renowned across the world for their quality,” said European Agriculture and Rural Development Commissioner Phil Hogan. “Consumers are willing to pay a higher price, trusting the origin and authenticity of these products, while further rewarding farmers.

https://twitter.com/euagri/status/1192026337050943488?s=21

This agreement shows our commitment to working closely with our global trading partners such as China. “It is a win for both parties, strengthening our trading relationship, benefitting our agricultural and food sectors, and consumers on both sides”.

EU quality schemes aim at protecting the names of specific products to promote their unique characteristics, linked to their geographical origin as well as traditional know-how. This is one of the great successes of European agriculture, with more than 3,300 EU names registered as either Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) or Protected Designation of Origin (PDO). A further 1,250 or so non-EU names are also protected within the EU, mostly thanks to bilateral agreements such as this one with China. In value terms, the market for EU geographical indications is around €74.8 billion, and together they account for 15.4% of total EU food and drinks exports.

Donald Tusk vows to protect French wine export

Addressing G7 Summit in Biarritz, France, the president of the European Union Council Donald Tusk called for “Putting a stop to trade wars. Trade deals and the reform of WTO are better than trade wars.Trade wars will lead to recession, while trade deals will boost the economy, not to mention the fact that trade wars among G7 members will lead to eroding the already weakened trust among us.”

The European Union will “respond in kind” if the U.S. imposes tariffs on France over digital tax plan, Donald Tusk added.

Before leaving for the Summit the American President Donald Trump warned about possible tariffs imposition on French wines in retaliation of the decision of National Assembly to tax US digital companies (GAFA) 3%, operating in France. At present this tax could generate an amount up to €500 million a year and more for the French state purse.

Italy champion of wine exports

Italy wine exports were worth 6.2 billion, keeping Italy second only to France in the ranking of world producers, said the report of the institute of Ministry of Agricultural, Food and Forestry Policies (ISMEA).

The value of Italian wine exports is up 3.3% in 2018 and has increased by 70% over the last decade.

Italy produced 55 million hectolitres of wine in 2018, an increase of 29% with respect to the previous year. In a report ISMEA said that 20 million hectolitres of that wine was sold abroad.

Germany stays in the lead in volumes of imports of Italian wines, followed by USA, UK, France, Canada, Switzerland, Austria, Russia and Sweden. However is value is considered, the Americans trend to buy the most expensive wines, followed by Germans and Britons. The Japanese are also partial of Italian wines, entering the list of 10 top importers in both volumes and value category.

Region of Puglia  delivers around 17% of the Italy’s total wine production,  producing more wine than any other region in Italy.

 

 

Ruinart Rosé champagne perfection

Just imagine 250 years ago, when a champagne with an unparalleled taste and colour was tasted for the very first time: the Œil de perdrix champagne , now known as Ruinart Rosé champagne.
Just imagine what those refined diners experienced when they discovered this champagne with its extraordinary colour. Flamboyant pink. How could a grand champagne house be so bold?

Ruinart Rosé was first brought to market in 1764. It was an instant success, not only in France, but beyond its borders as well. It grew quickly in popularity throughout Germany, the Netherlands, and Italy, then across Europe and in other continents.

It’s no accident that Maison Ruinart was founded in the Age of Enlightenment. It was a time when sophistication and philosophical thought took on huge importance, as well as the constant search for beauty, goodness and greater understanding.

Maison Ruinart was created in 1729, and its champagne was an integral part of the distinguished Enlightenment period. Elegance and finesse. Freshness and lightness.
The Chardonnay grape has shaped the signature of the Maison Ruinart. This delicate and demanding variety expresses itself through each of the Maison’s cuvées.

Chardonnay grapes from the Côte des Blancs and the Montagne de Reims make up 45% of the Ruinart Rosé blend.
This variety is so delicate and fragile that it takes specific know-how and a slow ripening process before it can reveal its delicacy and intensity.
Only the perfect mastery of this process allows the grapes to express the freshness of its citrus, floral, grapefruit, mint and rose aromas.
There is no room for error when revealing the characteristic delicacy and luminosity of this variety.
Unswerving dedication is required to achieve the unique character and aromatic freshness of Ruinart Rosé that is an integral part of Maison Ruinart.

Ruinart Rosé is composed of 55% Pinot Noir from the Montagne de Reims and the Vallée de la Marne, and 16% to 18% of that variety is made into red wine.
Powerful Pinot Noir brings body and roundness to the inimitable blend that creates this champagne. Close your eyes. Breathe in the aromas. And find freshly picked red berries: cherry, raspberry and wild strawberry.
Nose the wine again and enjoy the exotic notes of rose, pomegranate, lychee and guava.
And in the wake of these red berries and tropical fruit come the spicy notes of tonka bean and nutmeg.

Effervescence and intensity. Success and voluptuousness. Fruity notes that exude exoticism and singularity. Freshness and delicacy. Ruinart Rosé strikes an elegant balance, with its visual, aromatic, and flavoursome complexity.

And the balance of this Chardonnay and Pinot Noir blend brings Ruinart Rosé champagne into perfect equilibrium.

PORTUGAL: His Majesty ‘Sobroso’

Anna van Densky from ALENTEJO Majestic in its spacious grandeur Herdade do Sobroso stikes with its royal style, and natural splendor, offering an entire palette of inspirations: from exiting safari in the wild to relaxing afternoons at Estate with panoramic belle vue next to a swimming pool;  from classic Alentejo cuisine to tastings of modern and sophisticated wines from  its immense property. Reflecting the soul of Alentejo region, Sobroso is a must for a traveller, looking  for a genuine encounter with Portugal’ boundless universe.

Herdade do Sobroso

Herdade do Sobroso, Alentejo, Portugal, February 2018

A traveller finds a warm welcome in the hotel and the restaurant of the Estate, with skilled staff, making you feel like a royalty in spacious interiors, which got second life two decades ago with new ownership. In 2001 the property was acquired by an architect Antonio Ginestal Machado, who realised his ambition to transform the abandoned lands into a modern project assembling different faces of Alentejo :  wilderness and culture – cork-oak forest and vineyards, receiving guests in the Estate to share the fascination with the beauty of the place, and excellence of its wine and food, giving birth to Sobroso legend.

Hotel Herdade do Sobroso, Alentejo, Portugal

Herdade do Sobroso, Alentejo, Portugal, February 2018

As stylish as Estate, Sobroso wines represent refined taste of a young generation of producers. Inspired by Alentejo, they pay a greatest attention to creation of a special  compositions, unique in its relation to the region, terroir,  and charm of the Estate itself.

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The creativity in reflection of Alentejo unique beauty met utmost warm welcome among the wine experts – in spite of being a newcomer at competitive European wine market, Herdade do Sobroso received high esteem of the professionals awarded with medals of excellence. Aged for 18 month in French oak barrels,  Sobroso Reserva 2014 enchants with hints of wild berries, dark plum, and vanilla,  pleasing the eye with deep dark hue, and taste with long-lasting elegant finish.

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“Our wines are best match for classic Portuguese food, especially Alentejo cuisine”, – says oenologist Filipe Teixeira Pinto, explaining a concept of his compositions. A new generation of wine creators, he trotted the globe, before settling in the Estate in 2002, and since then devoting his skills and talent to Sobroso.  Following his advice the distinct flavour of  Bacalhau  from Senhora Josefa’s cuisine accompanied by white Herdade do Sobroso Cellar Selection 2016 makes an excellent lunch or dinner choice. With clear citrus colour, and aroma reminiscent of florals and tropical fruit, it impresses with freshness and intensity,  spelling out the Sobroso terroir.

Herdade do Sobroso cuisine

Herdade do Sobroso cuisine: classic Bacalhau accompanied by wines from Estate. 18 February 2018.

Panoramic views from Estate captures imagination by its infinity, and celestial blue light – there are hardly any rains in Alentejo,  making it an ideal destination for a journey any season. Located in the district of VidigueiraHerdade do Sobroso is bordered by the Mendro mountain range to the north, Guadiana River to the east, and to the south by vast plain stretching beyond the horizon (Pictured).

Herdade do Sobroso belle vue

Herdade do Sobroso belle vue,  Alentejo, Portugal, 18 February 2018

Tasting with the creator – oenologist Filipe Teixeira Pinto – in winery of Herdade do Sobroso adds a personal touch to the encounter with the Estate. Every wine label is a new chapter in a narrative of Sobroso: awaited by connoisseurs, and appreciated by public, searching for new experiences, and sophistication, representing Portuguese state of the art.

 

 

 

 

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