Tag Archives: Venice

Venice introduces visitors fee

With the slogan ‘make sure we don’t become like Venice‘, they do not mean that they sink into the water, but drown under mass tourism. With a tourist tax the city of Doges hopes to avert the disaster. Will that work and, if so, who will follow the Venetian example, Knack magazine inquires, rising issue of problems of mass tourism.

Venice suffers as consequence its own beauty. On the Rialto Bridge, in front of the Doge’s Palace or on San Marco, for example, it is teeming with tourists every day. If the sun is out, the “ant’s nest” will be even more dense.

“Nobody wants to be like Venice anymore,” the Spanish portal El Confidencial recently wrote in an article about mass tourism becoming problematic. However, the Municipality of Venice hopes to have an effective solution: entrance fees. That is “a measure that you won’t find anywhere else in the world,” says Mayor Luigi Brugnaro.

When the initiative is put into practice, it is not yet certain, but according to Mr Brugnaro it may already be introduced this summer. If that succeeds, then every visitor to Venice must pay three euros (€3) this year.

Next year, that amount must rise to six euros (€6). Depending on the season or an exceptional tourist excess, that amount can be elevated up to eight euros (€8). In between high touristic seasons the entrance falls back to three euros (€3). Those who have booked a hotel in the city do not have to pay the tourist tax, the measure will be applied only to day travelers.

Italy tourist “high tight”

The Colosseum stays the Italy’s most visited art site through 2018 followed by Pompeii and the Uffizi Gallery in Florence, the culture ministry announced.

State museums and archaeological sites were visited by more than 55 million people last year, a rise of five million in comparison to the previous year, the ministry underlined, and subsequently the benefits have risen by 35.4 million euros to almost 230 million euros, it said.

Colosseum inter

State museums and archaeological sites were visited by more than 55 million people last year, a rise of five million in comparison to the previous year, the ministry underlined, and subsequently the benefits have risen by 35.4 million euros to almost 230 million euros, they said.

MANN Director  Paolo Giulierini said being involved in the project is a “great honour”.
We hope it will bring many visitors both to the exhibitions as well as to our museum, considering the constant growth of Chinese tourists who are passionate about archaeology,” he said.

The Uffizi Gallery in Florence said it set records in visitor numbers and revenues last year. More than four million visitors entered the storied Florentine art gallery, 6% up on 2017, according to the announcement.
Revenues were 50.5% up on 2017 at 34 million euros.
The Gallery Director Eike Schmidt gave credit to the new season ticket and said the Museum results were seeing “exponential growth“.

However the mass tourism needs harnessing, and that is why one of the most successful sites in the world plans to charge day-trippers to enter the city and oblige people to “reserve access” before coming as “useless and damaging”.

Venice’s mayor, Luigi Brugnaro, announced that an entry tax would be implemented from 1 May. Each visitor will be charged €3 (£2.65), a cost that will rise to between €6 and €10, depending on the time of year, from 1 January 2020. The charge is expected to be added to the cost of arriving in the city by either train, cruise ship, bus or plane.

 

 

 

Venice assesses water damages

Venice Governor Luca Zaia reports billion euro damages the storms and floods have caused to one of the most famous touristic sites in the world.
The similar problems accrued in Liguria region, where hundreds of yachts were smashed into pieces at Rapallo marina harbor. However today the majority of museums reopened.

A several times during winter strong winds move water from the Adriatic Sea into the Venetian Lagoon, causing high tides and minor but widespread flooding across the historic site, however this time the water levels were extraordinary high.

So far half a million euro was dispatched as relief fund in Tuscany.

The experts of the Ministry of culture started to assess the presumed damage to the mosaic 12th century flooring of St Mark’s Basilica in Venice, submerged by an unusually high ‘acqua alta’ – the floods were the most damaging in a decade.

San Marco floor

 

Venice resists mass tourism

In Italy, Venice have already banned actions such as laying on benches or eating in the streets, however more regulations are on the way recommended by the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO), offering  to consider around  70 structural measures to harness tourists overflow.

It is hoped that a system of measures will control mass tourism and attract less rowdy visitors in a attempt to set a sustainable roadmap for urban tourism and place it in a wider urban agenda, also ensuring that local communities benefit from the positive aspects of arrivals.

Venice local communities welcome flows of tourists, but not overflow, causing noise and discomfort. The continuous public protests are providing reasons to create ways to preserve the quality of life in popular destinations without sacrificing tourism development, promotion and competitiveness.

As mega trends, such as globalization, urbanization, demographic shifts, rising middle-class and affluence come together with technological innovations, the effects of over-tourism will continue to impact local populations of the most spectacular sites.

The hunger for travel and the emergence of new tourism destinations have been met with a new ease and affordability supported by low-cost carriers and the recent emergence of home-sharing platforms.

One should not underestimate the challenge for the touristic industry, reducing it to a simple adjustment of pricing to balance supply and demand. While  straightforward increasing the costs of visiting a destination or site is likely to limit the number of visitors, but it also raises considerations of elitism and the ability of domestic tourists to access their own heritage.

 

Albania among top ten destinations

This week, the travel guide Lonely Planet named Tirana in their top ten “essential destinations in Europe” list, calling it a transformed “vigorous metropolis” and highlighting the city’s green and sustainable ethos.

Further showcasing Albania’s potential as a top tourist destination, Italian paper Travel News, named Drimadhes one of the five most beautiful beaches on the Mediterranean as well as “the most beautiful beach on the Albanian Riviera“. With direct flights to Tirana from over 30 cities in Europe, it is predicted that 2018 will witness the largest numbers yet of foreign tourists visiting Albania.

This year’s list aims at resolving the problem of overflow of tourists, or mass tourism, which devastates locals in communities like Reykjavik, Iceland, or Florence, Italy to name a few.  Some cities are even considering visitor caps per day to curb the problem. S The Mayors of overwhelmed by crowds cities have already taken measures. The municipality of Venice banned the new hotels and fast food restaurants opening in a bid to cap the number of tourists streaming through the streets.

Venice ‘visitor-only‘ routes to popular landmarks have been introduced last year ahead of the bank holiday weekend to keep tourists away from the locals – who have long complained about excessive crowds.

Topping Lonely Planet’s 2018 list for underrated European destinations is the Emilia-Romagna region in Italy, which is often overlooked in favor of more well-known regions like Tuscany, Campania and The Veneto.