Tag Archives: no deal

Westminster aims at one year Brexit delay

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson refused to negotiate further extension of Brexit deadline with the European Union, after he failed to win the support of Westminster for his Article 50 Agreement with the bloc, facing another delay caused by MP Oliver Letwin amendment. The MPs passed an amendment tabled by a cross-party group, led by Mr. Letwin by 322 votes to 306 – a majority of 16. The amendment says Parliament will withhold approval of the Prime minister’s deal until the withdrawal bill implementing Article 50 Agreement has been passed. In essence the #Letwin manoeuvre means winning time, shifting away the vote for endorsed in Brussels this week Brexit deal.

Voting down Prime Minister’s deal implies the request of a further postponement of abandoning the EU, the step Boris Johnson categorically denies, also pointing at the EU fatigue from the protracted debate on conditions of the departure.

MPs voted 322 to 306 in favour of a 26-word Letwin amendment that imposed an obligation on Prime Minister to ask the EU for a delay until the end of January 2020.

https://twitter.com/bbcpolitics/status/1185554708380839937?s=21

“And of course, the truth of it is this is all about getting a second referendum. That is what the Remainer forces in Parliament want. And the more time they buy, the more chance they’ve got of getting something like that passed. 

“So you know, we’ve got this odd situation that goes on and on and on. A Remain Parliament and a Leave country and it’s just the most awful situation.

“I feel in the absence of a general election, nothing is going to improve” said Member of the European Parliament, and the leader of Brexit party Nigel Farage in his comment to LBC TV after the vote.

The representative of the European Parliament at Brexit talks. Guy Verhofstadt wrote: “The @Europarl_EN’s Brexit Steering Group will consider the outcome of today’s vote for the Letwin amendment on Monday. Whatever happens next, the marches outside the Parliament show just how important a close EU – UK future relationship is”.

The EU spokesperson said the European Commission took a note of the vote supporting Letwin amendment. “It will be for the UK government to inform us about the next steps as soon as possible” she added.

https://twitter.com/eucopresident/status/1185628435554734080?s=21


The president of the European Council had a telephone
conversation with Prime Minister Johnson, and is awaiting an official letter, informing the EU about the situation in the Westminster.

Brexit: Sassoli vows to defend EU interest

“We want an agreement but we are aware that an agreement without a backstop wouldn’t work,” the speaker of the European Parliament, David Sassoli, said at a news conference in Brussels.

We are willing to go back to the original EU proposal which is that a backstop will only be added for Northern Ireland.

The European Union reacted on the British Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s comments indicating that he was willing to preserve an all-Ireland economy for checks on animals and food products, a single electricity market and travel zone.

Johnson: forced to delay Brexit again

Westminster including a number of former Conservatives expelled from the party, are preparing legal action in case the Prime Minister Boris Johnson refuses to request Brussels to delay Brexit beyond October 31.

A bill imposing to request an extension of the UK‘s departure date to avoid a no-deal Brexit on 31 October is set to gain royal assent.

But the PM has said he would “rather be dead in a ditch” than ask for a delay.

Now the Members of Parliament have formed a legal team and are willing to go to court to enforce the legislation, if necessary.

The cross-party bill – which requires the Prime minister to extend the Brexit deadline to next year (January 2020) unless Parliament agrees a deal with the EU by 19 October – was approved on Friday.

However the bill requires approval from Queen Elizabeth II. The government of Prime Minister Boris Johnson stands firmly against this initiative, and vows  to deliver Brexit according to the referendum results, in full respect of democracy.

EU-UK Brexit deal stays intact

The European Commission is willing to discuss Brexit with the UK over the coming weeks, a spokeswoman said on August 6. However the decision of keeping intact the negotiated with Theresa May government  deal remains unchanged. The Commission expressed readiness to add “words” to it in forms of declarations.

The EU executives have been hoping to avoid a “no-deal” scenario, the bloc is prepared for such an outcome as well.

The Commission does remain available over the coming weeks should the United Kingdom wish to hold talks and clarify its position in more detail, whether by phone or in person,” the spokeswoman said during regular Midday briefing.

 

EU Brexit half-a-year extension

European Union leaders agreed to offer the UK six more months to leave the bloc, more than Prime Minister Theresa May said she requested. The Brussels Summit concluded in the early hours on April 11 that the second extension is granted, which signifies Britain will not exit on April 12, as the suggested the first extension, shifting the deadline to October 31.

However the extension  does not define if it must end with the UK exit, or it can be followed by the other extension in case the deal is not endorsed by the Westminster by that moment. It certainly offers more time to Prime minister to convince the Members of Parliament to support her Article 50 Agreement with the EU. The deal rejected three times in the House of Commons is not to be re-opened or re-negotiated the EU underlines, claiming it is the best possible agreement, and there will be not other.

The shifting of  the Brexit deadline has an impact on the European Parliament, meaning the UK has an obligation to organise the European elections,  being the EU member-state. Any further shifting the deadline beyond end October would mean the UK would participate in appointment of the European Commissioners, the development seen as irrelevant to the UK decision to leave the EU.

 

EU to grant May conditional Brexit extension

European Union will grant Prime Minister Theresa May a second delay to Brexit deadline at an emergency summit on April 10,  but the are many indications that the leaders will impose the conditions.

Before the Summit  PM May visited Berlin and Paris on the eve of the summit to agree with Angela Merkel and Emmanuel Macron to allow her to put off the departure from April 12 to June 30, a day before the constitution of the new European Parliament.

May had requested the EU to shift the deadline to June 30 but the EU Brussels a has an intention of a conditional extension to end of the year or even for one year to end March 2020. The question is if the UK government will be in the position to accept the conditions imposed with the deadline shift.

May-Corbyn compromise evokes skepticism

British Prime Minister Theresa May met opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn in an attempt to find a common Brexit solution, endorsing her government Article 50 Agreement with the EU.

After her EU withdrawal deal  (WA) was rejected three times in the House of Commons, with MPs, including her Conservative Party divided over Brexit deal negociated for two years, May said she would talk to the Labour Party leader in a bid to overcome the stalemate, becoming a Brexit crisis.

Nicola Sturgeon, First minister of Scotland said a deal between Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn will be a “second best compromise” that “satisfies nobody, makes the country poorer, and potentially could be unpicked by a new Prime minister like Boris Johnson

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